INTO PRINT

The University of Iowa Business Services newsletter

Spring 2009

Into Print aims to educate, inform, and entertain its readers, with a goal of fostering positive communication between its participating departments, their staffs, and their clients.

In this issue

News briefs

First-class mail postage going up
Med Labs Copy Center to close
Surplus customers now can charge to UI ID cards
Road behind MBSB closed for construction
Online training for driving maxi vans
Into Print goes to three times a year

TypeStrikes

General news

Fiscal-year-end deadlines set - plan, submit orders soon
Business Services poised to meet sustainability goals
Printing and Mailing Services begins partnership with Iowa City schools
Welcome, new Business Services staff

General Stores

General Stores ordering systems to change

Laundry Service

Laundry featured in fyi
Whole lotta shakin' going on . . .

Mailing Services

Daily run to UNI means lower mail costs for all
Mailing Services manager earns certification

Parking and Transportation

Time to renew parking permits
Cashiered parking facilities now accept credit cards
Free roadside assistance from Fleet Services
Character Counts: Meet Linda Noble
Long-time P&T employee Leanna McGuire retires

Printing Services

Printing Services implements online storefront
Personalize print communications with variable data printing
Just the ticket!

Surplus

Check out the new, fresh look for Surplus

We like feedback

Send Story ideas, address corrections, additions, e-mail
We are . . .
Directories
The University of Iowa Nondiscrimination Statement


NEWS BRIEFS

First-class mail postage going up

The U.S. Postal Service will raise prices for first-class mail and some services on May 11. A first-class stamp will increase from 42 to 44 cents. The USPS plans to make price adjustments annually. Forever stamps purchased before the increase will remain valid. Links to the new prices are on the Mailing Services home page.

Med Labs Copy Center to close

The Copy Center in Med Labs will close June 26. Customers who have been using it should send their electronic files to Copy Center 10 in the Boyd Law Building. Training sessions have already been held for many departments. Another will be held from 9:30 to 11 a.m. on June 9, in 01136 PFP. It will be very informative, so we stongly encourage customers to attend.

Surplus customers now can charge to UI ID cards

UI students and employees may now purchase items at Surplus with their University of Iowa ID card. Charges are applied to their U-bill.

Road behind MBSB closed for construction

The South Riverside Drive entrance to the Mossman Business Services Building is closed due to construction of the south bypass around Iowa City. The main entrance, on Old Highway 218 South, remains open. There is increased truck traffic at this entrance as a result of the closure, so please use extra caution. The project is expected to be finished this fall. . . . . map and directions

Online training for driving maxi vans

Fleet Services has recently introduced new training to replace the videotape for defensive driving and 15-passenger van training. This training is accessible from any computer that has internet access, and the tests are scored immediately. The cost for each test is $2. Call the Fleet Services office, 384-0564, to find out how to register.

Into Print goes to three times a year

In order to conserve resources and reduce costs, the publication schedule for Into Print will change from four to three times a year: winter, spring, and fall. Time-sensitive information will be conveyed via email and departmental websites.


TYPESTRIKES

from our typo treasure chest

medications may affect your frelexes


GENERAL NEWS

Fiscal-year-end deadlines set - plan, submit orders soon

The fiscal year end is approaching; it is time to plan and place orders to be billed to 2009 budgets. Please be aware of the following deadlines:

Copy Centers:   Work performed as of 11:59 p.m. on Tuesday, June 30, will be billed in fiscal year 2009. Work performed after that will be billed in fiscal year 2010.

General Stores:   Orders faxed or mailed and received by 2 p.m. on June 30 and those entered directly by a department on the MIGS and SIGS ordering systems by 4 p.m. on June 30 will be included in the current fiscal year.

Parking & Transportation:   Parking Services' Departmental Business, Service Vehicle Zone, and Pentacrest placard renewal forms will be sent to all departments that currently have them by the end of May. Faculty and staff permits must be renewed this year. (Related article.)

Printing Services:   Printing work performed by 5:30 p.m. June 30 will be charged in fiscal year '09. The balance of charges for jobs in progress will be made when they are completed and closed. Place FY '09 orders soon to be sure they will meet the deadline. Special Printing Orders (SPOs) issued by 4 p.m. June 30 will be encumbered in FY '09. The charges will be based on the estimated invoice from the vendor.

Mailing Services:   Mail processed by 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 30, will be charged in fiscal year '09. Please send us mailings as early in the day as possible.


Business Services poised to meet sustainability goals

The Iowa state Board of Regents has made sustainability at the regents' institutions a priority. In a report presented at the March meeting, goals were identified for eight areas. Business Services departments have a jump start on the initiative, with active and ongoing engagement in four of them.

Planning and Development
The goals include increasing electronic business solutions to reduce the demand for paper. We have put dozens of forms and hundreds of pages of information online; we accept files, applications, and registrations electronically; we now encourage email renewals for parking permits. The Surplus workflow is going from paper to electronic, as is part of the bus pass program.

Purchasing
The report proposes buying more products with a reduced environmental impact and using e-procurement. Printing Services supplies recycled paper; most of the office paper and almost all of the rough paper, such as paper towels, sold by General Stores is recycled. Laundry's equipment uses less water, steam, electricity, and natural gas. The new computer-to-plate system at Printing Services eliminates the toxic waste issues created by film imaging and developing, and General Stores and Printing Services are developing online ordering.

Materials and recycling
Reducing the volume of materials and resources consumed, and reusing or recycling resources and materials are the sole focus - and purpose - of Surplus. The wash process at Laundry recycles rinse water and, in winter, ambient heat from the equipment helps warm the building. Printing Services recycles all possible production waste, such as paper trimmings and cardboard shipping boxes.

Transportation
To increase fuel efficiency and reduce fuel use, air pollution, and green house gas and carbon dioxide emissions, Parking and Transportation has increased the use of E85, biodiesel alternate fuels, and flex fuel, and it has begun to purchase hybrid and electric vehicles. It promotes alternative transportation through Cambus, reduced-price passes for Coralville and Iowa City bus systems, a van pool program, car-pool matching, and bicycle parking on campus.

It's a good start, but everyone recognizes there is much more to do. The report is on line at www2.state.ia.us/regents, agenda item 15 for the March 18-19 meeting.


Printing and Mailing Services begins partnership with Iowa City schools

UI Printing and Mailing Services has begun a partnership with the Iowa City Community School District to fulfill its printing and copying needs. The MBSB Copy Center is producing the district's work, delivering the majority of orders within 24 hours. Each morning a courier picks up orders at the district's administrative office, then returns at the end of the day with deliveries.

The partnership benefits both entities: UI provides a quality product for the schools, and the district is able to reduce costs. School district customers have made positive comments about the service.


Welcome, new Business Services staff

Mail clerk Shanda Jones joined UI Mailing Services in February. Previously she worked in Mailing Services at Augustana College in Bettendorf. She and her husband, John, recently moved to North Liberty, which makes her happy because it has reduced drastically the daily commuting time.

The Business Services information technology group has two new programmers. Jinping Gu designs and develops Parking and Transportation's online applications. She previously worked for Twin State Technical Services, an IT consulting company. Originally from China, Ping holds a degree in electrical engineering from Hunan University and an MS in computer science from Marycrest College in Davenport.

Valerij Petrulevich's first priority is to develop an online storefront for print orders. Before joining Business Services he worked in the Oakdale offices of Pohaku Inc., a business development company headquartered in Washington, Iowa. A native of Lithuania, he earned a degree from Syracuse University.

Bill Kramer began working at Surplus in early April. His work involves directing the crew and pricing stock. He previously worked at a property management company in Cedar Rapids and lives in North Liberty.

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GENERAL STORES

General Stores ordering systems to change

Exciting changes are beginning to happen at General Stores. We are working with the Purchasing Department to implement two new procurement and ordering tools, eBuy and PeopleSoft Inventory.

The eBuy project is scheduled to be implemented on May 18. This new ordering tool will replace MIGS, and it will allow our customers to order with their MFK account number on the OfficeMax website and use Workflow for approvals. The PeopleSoft Inventory project will eventually replace SIGS. This is a PReq process. Implementation for this project is scheduled for August. Training will be announced as that time approaches.

These systems will significantly change the way we track inventory and the way our customers place orders. Customers will see new screens and have new options not presently available. Some stock numbers will change, processes will change, and terminologies will change.

Some of our staff will be preoccupied with these implementations over the next several months. If you have questions, please do not hesitate to ask. Additional information will be forthcoming as we proceed with the implementations.   — Gary Anderson

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LAUNDRY SERVICE

Laundry featured in fyi

See the March 23 issue of fyi for "One mean cleaning machine," a photo feature on Laundry Service, and an article about Aggie Rochwick, a 41-year employee there.

Whole lotta shakin' going on . . .

. . . at UI Laundry Service. When manager Dave Gray purchased a Pik-Quik mechanized sheet and blanket shaker, our production employees' job got a lot less physical. And that is a good thing. This is the science of ergonomics well applied.

Linens washed in our front-loading, 450-pound capacity machines get very clean and use much less water and detergent to do so. However, one drawback is that sheets get badly tangled as they tumble in the washer. The drying process only alleviates part of the tangling. This means production employees must use muscle power to separate the sheets before feeding them into the sheet ironer. Sometimes this can lead to neck, arm, and back strain. But thanks to the Pik-Quik, not any more!

The Pik-Quik looks like a large metal box on stilts. A cart of newly washed sheets is pushed between the stilts. Then a mechanical arm with two pinching fingers picks up a sheet and moves straight up. If the sheet does not budge the fingers release it, the cart ratchets a few inches, and the arm tries again. When the sheet goes up with the arm, pneumatic air ports poof the sheet with enough force to propel it into rollers. The rollers then send the newly fluffed sheet into a cart to await pressing.

How did we ever get along without this little gem? It pinches, it pulls, it fluffs, it senses, it ratchets, and it takes away all the physical effort previously needed to untangle newly washed sheets before they are fed into the ironer for pressing and finishing.

There are many advantages: The footprint of the Pik-Quik is small and takes up little space. The only utilities required are electricity and an 80- to 120-psi air supply. It operates automatically, with little babysitting, allowing employees to complete other tasks at the same time. But most impressive is the reduction in repetitive motion for the worker.   — Jo Anne Worley

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MAILING SERVICES

Please note!

If your department moves, contact Mailing Services manager Kathy Battin. If your building's security locks are changed, contact Campus Mail. This will help us give you the best possible service!

Daily run to UNI means lower mail costs for all

In an effort to reduce costs and duplication of services, The University of Iowa is partnering with the University of Northern Iowa to process its first-class and bulk mail. As a result, both schools use resources more effectively and save money through substantially lower postage rates.

Every day at 9:30 a.m., a UI Mailing Services employee drives to Cedar Falls to deliver and pick up mail. Mail is being loaded into the van by 11:45, and the return trip to Iowa City is under way by noon. Back at the Mossman building it goes into the processing stream together with UI mail.

The partnership saves a substantial amount on operating expenses. In the end, both schools benefit from increased postage discounts and overall lower mailing costs.   — Sanda Pop

Mailing Services manager earns certification

UI Mailing Services manager Kathy Battin has earned the Certified Mail and Distribution Systems Manager accreditation. The program is administered by the Mail System Management Association, an organization dedicated to professional advancement of those in the mail distribution industry.

To qualify for the program and gain certification, an individual must be employed in the field, have managerial experience, demonstrate expertise in several related areas, and successfully complete a rigorous, four-hour exam. The certification is valid for two years. Of the seven candidates from Iowa and Kansas who took the test in November, two passed. One of them was Kathy - congratulations!

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PARKING & TRANSPORTATION

Time to renew parking permits

Parking Services has sent e-mails to faculty and staff who have parking permits, notifying them it is time for renewal. Those who wish to renew electronically must reply to the email by May 15. Anyone who does not will receive a paper form in the mail.

The e-mail asks for a University ID number, department name and address, the lot or ramp number, the current access card number, and the vehicle license number. It also asks for confirmation to continue payment via payroll deduction. The fee may be prepaid in full or paid through monthly deductions.

Those who renew their permits will be e-mailed a notice on June 1 confirming the renewal. Permits will be sent in Campus Mail or can be picked up at the IMU ramp or Hospital Ramp 2 after July 15. Most parking fees are unchanged from the 2007-2009 schedule. For more information, see the Parking and Transportation website at www.uiowa.edu/parking, or call 335-1475.

Cashiered parking facilities now accept credit cards

Parking patrons have a new option for paying ramp fees at the cashier booths - Visa and MasterCard. The Parking and Transportation Department implemented this option to give patrons another method of payment and to reduce the amount of cash transactions.

Credit cards are widely accepted among businesses, so incorporating them at the ramps has made it easier for patrons. There is no longer a need to carry as much cash or be concerned whether there is enough to pay for parking. This form of payment has been very positive for patrons.

To prepare for the transition, over 150 parking attendants were trained to use credit card terminals, process transactions, and be alert to security issues associated with credit cards (to date, there have been none).

Credit card usage started slowly: about 100 out of 10,000 daily transactions used them. This is expected to increase. Credit cards have been used for a range of charges, from as little as 70 cents to more than $15.

Accepting credit cards in the ramps is reducing the amount of cash handled in the field. This is consistent with Parking's desire to reduce risks and increase the security of cash. Although credit cards are not currently accepted in the parking offices, there is a plan to allow them at those sites in the future.   — Michelle Ribble

Free roadside assistance from Fleet Services

Fleet Services provides a free roadside assistance for its customers. This service is available whether you rent a vehicle or lease one long term. If you happen to leave your lights on and need a jump start, lock your keys in the car, or run out of gas you have a 24-hour, 365 day-a-year resource for help. If you have a problem while you are away from Iowa City, call the 800 number on the blue-and-white card in the pouch that has the fuel card. They will find a service station in your area and send a tow truck to fix the problem and get you back on the road.   — Mike Wilson

Character Counts: Meet Linda Noble

Linda Noble, Parking and Transportation, began her career as secretary to the assistant director of Security and Parking thirty-one years ago, in 1978. One of her first challenges was to help organize the University's Van Pool program, which began operating that year with four vans for fewer than sixty employees. She helped plan for and provided much of the administrative support for the program while fielding the numerous operational calls required to keep it going. Today the Van Pool program operates 84 vans for about 860 participants.

Linda was promoted to office coordinator and in 1984 Parking was combined with Cambus to form the Parking and Transportation Department. A year later Linda was promoted to manager for the entire University parking system. As manager she was responsible for day-to-day operations for nearly all employee, student, patient, and public parking programs. She also oversaw the parking for special events, including football, basketball, and concerts, and helped develop the parking plan for the first NCAA National Championship Wrestling tournament hosted by the University.

In the late 1990s, as the campus population grew and demands for services soared, the department was reorganized. Linda became Parking Services manager, a position where many of the pressures of employee and student parking demand remain focused. She has held one of the most challenging positions on campus and has filled it fairly, honestly and admirably. Linda retired from Parking and Transportation on April 30. A reception for her will be held on Wednesday, May 6, in the IMU North Room from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.

During her career Linda saw the campus transform and grow numerous times. When she started, there were only 8,000 parking spaces spread across dozens of small, close-in surface lots conveniently interspersed among buildings to serve employees and students - and just three multilevel structures and four cashiered sites for patients and the public. Cambus provided direct commuter service only to the Hancher area and Lot 43.

Today, there are 16,000 spaces in over 100 facilities, including eight structures and thirteen cashiered sites. Cambus provides more than a third of its service to peripheral parking lots, which now constitute a third of the total system parking capacity.

And, by the way, Linda raised two sons, Scott and David, while she handled all this. She intends to stay in Iowa, where her sons are raising their children and where her sister also remains.   — Dave Ricketts

Long-time P&T employee Leanna McGuire retires

Leanna McGuire retired from the Parking and Transportation Department on April 3 after more than thirty-one years with the University. She came to work in 1977 when Bob Commings was the football coach, Hospital Ramp 2 was not yet completed, and Carver Hawkeye Arena had not even been designed.

Lea started as a clerk for Parking in the Security Building, which was located where the Seamans Center now stands. Soon the Parking Office moved to the IMU Ramp, where she often worked the counter. In 1985 Lea became the Parking Office coordinator and took over management of the Van Pool program. During this time Parking combined with Cambus and a transition from mainframe computer terminals to personal computers began.

The introduction of PCs led to dramatic changes in the way offices were managed. These changes were accompanied by LANs, ethernet, Windows, IT security, printing failures, crashes, upgrades, and system incompatibilities. Parking and Transportation needed in-house assistance, and Lea began quietly educating herself on PCs and related software.

In 1995, after years of informally being the department's in-house support desk, Lea moved into its administrative group to become a full-time technical support lifesaver. She successfully combined a thorough knowledge of the enterprise with her technical know-how to solve countless problems and move the department past numerous roadblocks. Lea was simply invaluable.

When she came to work for Parking, Lea brought with her many wonderful baked treats to share, a dry sense of humor, a fear of flying, and a love of attending Hancher and theater events. She was also a long-time volunteer for the Iowa City Public Library, which fed her serious reading habit. Along the way she raised three daughters, no mean feat in and of itself.

Lea has already moved to Arkansas to care for her mother, but we hope to see her back from time to time to endure an Iowa winter and to bring treats.   — Dave Ricketts

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PRINTING SERVICES

Printing Services implements online storefront

UI Printing Services is developing an online storefront and plans to implement the first phase in early May. It will provide a secure, simple ordering process and work flow for print orders.

Phase one involves online ordering for business cards. Customers will be able to log on, view the available styles, select a template, check the price, type in the information to be printed, view a proof online, and place the order. The proof is generated dynamically and displays the card exactly as it will print, which reduces duplication of work - and errors. Multiple items may be included in a single order. Eventually, customers will be able to browse and order from a catalog of business cards, letterhead, envelopes, and other products.

The storefront will simplify our customers' tasks of managing print orders and accounts. It will generate reports that show what has been ordered and when; what has been shipped and when; an order's status in real time; and a full ordering history.

Advantages to Printing Services include increased efficiency and economy: the system organizes jobs to print like ones together and interfaces with our production, distribution, and billing functions.

During phase one, staff in a limited number of departments will be trained to use the system. It will be more widely available in later phases. Watch for more information!

Personalize print communications with variable data printing

Would you like to gain your readers' attention fast and increase their response to your mailings? Try this: personalize your communications with UI Printing and Mailing Services variable data (VDP, also known as mail merge) capabilities. You provide the data base and we create a personalized printed piece for you.

Self mailers, which are mail pieces not enclosed in an envelope, are quite successful. They can be addressed to each individual on your mailing list, with his or her name printed throughout the document. This can save time, money and headaches.

The digital color press we use for VDP offers a number of creative options. In any print run, each piece can have variations in text, photos, graphics, and layout to customize it for an individual reader. Text can be oriented in various directions, such as on an incline.

Your mail pieces can be as personalized as much as you wish. "This service that we provide is limited by only your imagination," says Kathy Battin, Mailing Services manager. Business reply mail pieces may be printed with the customer's return address. Envelopes may be printed with the customer's name matching the enclosed personalized letter; printing can be set up to use window envelopes in which the recipient's name appears in the window. Our customers who use the service are finding it convenient, economical, and helpful in meeting their goals.

"This year UI Mailing Services has handled our large-volume letters for both prospective undergraduate students and those who have applied and been offered admission, in addition to other jobs that have included variable data printing. Kathy and the Mail staff have processed multiple batches of these targeted communications in a timely manner, and have provided consultation and recommendations that have allowed for postage savings," says Matt Kroeger, associate director in the Office of Admissions.

"We have found that by utilizing Mailing Services' ability to integrate mail with printing, we save both time and money. We have used this variable data process for a variety of printed materials, including invitations, postcards, and newsletters, and find that whether our project is small or large, priority or bulk, their services are always first class," says Jill Fishbaugh, director of external relations for the College of Education.

Try our variable data printing! The Mailing Services manager meets with departments at UI and the University of Northern Iowa to educate and train customers about it and our color printing options. Contact her at 384-3809 for more information.   — Sanda Pop

Just the ticket!

Last year, Printing and Mailing Services began printing and mailing UI athletic event tickets. The project illustrates not only our variable data printing but also our digital color capability. We printed 100,000 tickets for football, basketball (men's and women's) and wrestling; each one contained information that was different from every other one. For example, women's basketball included 20 games with as many as ten variable fields such as name, section, row, seat, bar code, game date, and opponent for each game, for each ticket holder. After successful print runs on all of them, the department looks forward to next year's jobs.

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SURPLUS

Check out the new, fresh look for Surplus

Spring cleaning time? Well, it is at UI Surplus. The new management is taking it very seriously, cleaning and rearranging the sales floor to make it more welcoming for customers. The result is a clean, more professional look.

Surplus has recycled or disposed of items that were more than ten years old to make space for inventory with potential for faster turnover. A new layout has helped with sales, too, because customers have easier access to the merchandise - so it sells out rather fast.

"We have cleaned up a lot of stuff that was not moving and was collecting dust. Our goal is to create a different look every week on the sales floor, which we believe will encourage customers to come back," says Steve Stange, the new Surplus manager. He steps into the position with strong people skills developed during his twenty years with UI Public Safety, and Solon City Council and volunteer firefighting experience.

Stange says he loves working with his team and believes its extraordinary effort and hard work, essential to the department's success, have made all the changes possible. Employees are multi-tasking and working in different ways, he says.

Chris West, a clerk at Surplus, is taking control of the paperwork and tracking inventory. Bill Kramer, a new, full-time employee, oversees equipment as it comes in and assesses the sales options. "We are trying to get the best bang for the buck," Stange says.

Surplus is striving to find different ways to become more efficient and to offer low prices to UI departments and the public. It has partnered with Heartland Recovery, a North Liberty company that conducts surplus and asset liquidation sales, to sell lab and medical equipment. Computers are now located on the ground floor, making them more accessible to customers. Starting in the fall, Surplus will sell UI athletics equipment as well.

Check out the new Surplus. It is open to UI departments from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesdays and to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursdays.   — Sanda Pop

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WE LIKE FEEDBACK!

Story ideas

Are there topics we haven't covered that you would like to see in our newsletter? Do you have questions you would like us to address? Send an e-mail to the editor or a memo to Into Print, 129 MBSB.

Address corrections and additions

If you wish to be added to the Into Print mailing list, fill out and send our form. Use only University of Iowa campus addresses and @uiowa.edu e-mail suffixes.

E-mail us

Send questions and comments about departmental topics to:
Bionic Bus
Cambus information
Central Mail
Commuter Programs
Fleet Services
General Stores
Parking Facilities Operations
Parking Services
Copy Center #2, 100 Mossman Building
Copy Center #3, C102 Pappajohn Business Building
Copy Center #10, 180 Boyd Law Building
UPACS and Copyright Service

We are . . .

Business Services: Equipment Rental, General Stores, Laundry, Parking & Transportation, Printing and Mailing Services, and Surplus, serving The University of Iowa community. The print version of Into Print is distributed free and on request to UI faculty, staff, and students.

Contributors to this issue

Gary Anderson/Business Services; Sanda Pop/Business Services; Michelle Ribble, Dave Ricketts, Mike Wilson/Parking and Transportation; and Jo Anne Worley/Laundry.

Editor and web administrator: Jenean Arnold, phone 319-384-3723, 129 Mossman Building.

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