Collaborators

Current Collaborators:

Steve Westrop, University of Oklahoma


Steve’s OU Web Page

Talia Karim, University of Colorado Museum of Natural History
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At Ibex Section H, summer 2010.

Talia's CU Web Page

Gerry Kloc, University of Rochester
GerryKloc
Gerry and I are working on projects describing new Silurian calymenids from the eastern US and a trilobite fauna from the Lower Silurian (Aeronian) Sexton Creek Formation in Missouri.

Past Collaborators:

Richard Fortey, The Natural History Museum, London (Emeritus)

I worked with Richard for four years as a NERC and Leverhulme post-doc at the NHM.

Brian Chatterton, University of Alberta (Emeritus)

Brian was my doctoral advisor, and we coauthored many papers then and since.
Brian’s U of A Web Page

Greg Edgecombe, The Natural History Museum, London
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Greg and I collaborated in the (now quite distant) past on encrinurids, calymenids, and Malvinokaffric Realm aulacopleurids.
Greg’s NHM Web Page

Shanan Peters, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Shanan and I collaborated on the description of new (and highly surprising) material of Cedarina from the Weeks Formation of western Utah, which he collected for his Chicago dissertation.
Shanan’s U of Wisconsin, Madison Web Page

Denis Tetreault, University of Windsor

Denis and I described Radnoria bretti from the Rochester Shale in 2006, and hopefully soon will collaborate again on description of beautifully preserved calymenids from the same unit.
Denis’s U of Windsor Web Page

Nigel Hughes, University of California, Riverside

I worked a little bit with Nigel quite a long time ago on an early study of trilobite segmentation and its phylogenetic context.
Nigel’s U of California, Riverside Web Page

Mark Wilson, University of Alberta

A very, very long time ago I actually worked on the systematics of fossil fish. It started as a graduate independent study project with Mark Wilson, and we ended up publishing it in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. I have no idea how well it’s held up (a new genus and a couple of new species), but it was a lot of fun to work on.
Mark’s U of Alberta Web Page