CNM Concert Season 39

David Gompper, Director
Joseph Dangerfield, R.A.



2004-05
CNM Concert II


Notes & Bios
   Richard HERVIG
 Michael ECKERT
 Andrew JASINSKI
 Rodion SHCHEDRIN
 

   SEASON: 
   CONCERT: 


 PROGRAM NOTES & BIOS




Clapp Recital Hall
Sunday, December 5, 2004, 8:00 p.m.










Sonata No.1 for Clarinet and Piano (1953) Richard HERVIG
Maurita Mead,  clarinet
Carole Thomas,   piano

Toccata Richard HERVIG
Kazuo Murakami,   piano

The Subtle Thief
Richard HERVIG
Dennis Wilhoit,   baritone
Joseph Dangerfield,   piano

Chamber music for Six Players
Richard HERVIG
Lynn Bowes,   flute
Heather Bynum,   clarinet/bass clarinet
Jeffrey Strom,   percussion
Kazuo Murakami,   piano
Alla Cross,   violin
Valdir Claudino,   contrabass
Joseph Dangerfield,   conductor


Intermission

Bassoon Duo Michael ECKERT
Benjamin Coelho & William LaRue Jones,   bassoon

Funk Hole (after Lelio) (2004) Andrew JASINSKI
Lynn Bowes,   flute
Tom Yu,   clarinet/bass clarinet
Karen Lichnovsky,   oboe
Shaye Bowman,   bassoon
tba,   horn
Joel Crawford,   trumpet
Mathew Driscoll,   trombone
Ginny Armstrong,   percussion
Kazuo Murakami,   piano
Alla Cross,   violin I
Sara Mimick,   violin II
Julia Emil,   viola
Ryan Kratsch,   violoncello
Ruthie Lucas,   contrabass
David Gompper,   conductor

The Geometry of Sound Rodion SHCHEDRIN
Lynn Bowes,   flute
Tom Yu,   clarinet/bass clarinet
Karen Lichnovsky,   oboe
Shaye Bowman,   bassoon
tba,   horn
Joel Crawford,   trumpet
Mathew Driscoll,   trombone
Ginny Armstrong & Andrea Verdoorn,   percussionists
Joseph Dangerfield,   celeste
Luke Dahn,   Yamaha DX-7
Pam Weest-Carrasco,   harp
Kazuo Murakami,   piano
Alla Cross,   violin I
Sara Mimick,   violin II
Julia Emil,   viola
Laura Ewing,   violoncello
Kevin Franca,   contrabass
David Gompper,   conductor



 




 

RICHARD HERVIG
Sonata No.1 for Clarinet and Piano (1953)

This, the earliest work on the concert, was composed while I was teaching at Long Beach State College (1952-55). It was written for Bert McGarrity, clarinet, and Dave Vazquez, piano, both of whom have since died. The three movements are neo-classical, Fast, Slow, Fast, including (at least one!) fugato. The work is distinctly tonal, and is one of my most frequently performed.

Toccata for piano solo

The Toccata for piano solo listed is from 1997. It was actually composed much earlier, (I'm not sure when) and has since had several revisions.

The Subtle Thief, for mezzo-soprano and piano

The Subtle Thief, for mezzo-soprano and piano, is a setting of the Milton Sonnet which begins "How now hath time, the subtle thief of youth, stolen on its wing my three - and twentieth year." It was composed in 1997, for the composer's eightieth birthday concert at the Juilliard School.

Sonatina

The Chamber music for Six Players (Flute, Clarinet/Bass Clarinet, Violin, Contrabass, Piano and Percussion) was composed in 1976 as part of the Bi-centennial (1776-1976) celebration.

Each state provided music relevant to that state. The works were performed in the order that each state entered the union. They were performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. The title is relevant to the works which is for six players, (not six instruments)!

Since it was from Iowa, I included a theme from a piano composition by Bix Beiderbeck, who was born in Davenport, Iowa.
Richard Hervig, (b. Story City, IA, 24 Nov 1917). American composer and educator. He studied English at Augustana College, Sioux Falls, South Dakota (BA 1939) and after teaching for a time in the public schools, studied composition with Clapp at the University of Iowa (MA 1942, PhD 1947). He joined the faculty there in 1955 and became the founding director of the Center for New Music in 1966. Upon his retirement in 1988, he was appointed to a post at the Julliard School. His pupils have included Charles Dodge and William Hibbard, among others. He has received commissions from the National Music Council, the National Federation of Music Clubs and numerous performers.

Hervig's compositions, most of which are instrumental and tonal, show a disciplined approach to standard forms and an exploration of timbral possibilities. In two early works, the Clarinet Sonata no. 1 and the String Quartet, he casts sections in confliction rhythms, exploiting the resulting tensions. In the Chamber Music for Six Players, he continued his concern for establishing relationships between the parts while maintaining a separate musical personality for each instrument; in this way, his compositional approach takes on concerns more readily associated with the theatre.

 

MICHAEL ECKERT
Bassoon Duo

Bassoon Duo was written between December 2003 and May 2004 for Benjamin Coelho and Franck Leblois, professor of bassoon at the Conservatoire d'Angouleme, France, for a CD recording of works for two bassoons. The piece is a single movement lasting about six minutes.
Michael Eckert joined the Composition/Theory Area of the University of Iowa School of Music in 1985, becoming an Associate Professor in 1988. He studied composition with John Richard Ronsheim at Antioch College, and with Ralph Shapey at the University of Chicago. His awards for composition include the Bearns Prize from Columbia University, a Charles E. Ives Scholarship from the National Institute of Arts and Letters, an NEA fellowship, and the Music Teachers National Association Distinguished Composer of the Year Award. He has been a fellow at the Charles Ives Center for American Music, and at the Composers Conference at Wellesley College.
 

ANDREW JASINSKI
Funk Hole (after Lelio) (2004)

During the composition of what would become my thesis piece, I had the opportunity to study Berlioz's 1831 score Lelio ou le retour a la vie while enrolled in a Genres of Music seminar on the symphonic poem. I found the fifth movement of the work, La harpe eolienne- Souvenirs, particularly engaging. Berlioz had excerpted the entire movement (with marginal revision) from an earlier work, La mort d'Orphee, an unsuccessful submission for the 1827 Prix de Rome. More than any other movement in Lelio, it is explicitly mimetic: an evocation of wind blowing through an Aeolian harp, the final chord ascends through the harmonic series to the seventh partial (or its equal-tempered approximation), ending the movement with a non-functional major-minor seventh built on the tonic. The allure that gesture held for me, the explicitness of the tone-painting and the suggestion of something prefabricated about the movement drew me to use it as the basis for my own work. I quote it freely throughout, departing from the original by varying degrees. Tendency tones from the original A-major tonality (G#/A, C#/D, E/F/F#) retain a likeness to their function (use of b6 in major to destabilize the tonic; expansion of the subdominant as a form of dominant replacement), though within a predominantly non-tonal context. The title refers to my reading of the protagonist Lelio's reclusive, convalescent nature, and to the inviolacy of interior life, the want for that inviolacy, or the lack of an interior life altogether.
Andrew Jasinski (b.1977, Okinawa, Japan) is studying towards the MA degree at The University of Iowa, having received the BMus in music theory and composition from Christopher Newport University in Virginia. While at Iowa he has participated in master classes with Andrew May, Marilyn Shrude, Fabio Ciardi and Alessandro Cipriani of Edison Studio, David Rakowski and Vladimir Tarnopolski. His teachers have included Jennifer Barker, Amelia Kaplan, Lawrence Fritts and David Gompper. Jasinski's music will be featured on a forthcoming CD celebrating the 40th anniversary of The University of Iowa Electronic Music Studios. He currently resides in the Chicago area.
 

RODION SHCHEDRIN
The Geometry of Sound

Rodion Shchedrin (b Moscow, 16 Dec 1932), graduated from the Moscow Conservatory in 1955 and taught there between 1965 and 1969, thereafter as a freelance artist. He is married to the ballerina Mayya Plisetskaya. A prolific writer, Shchedrin is considered one of the preeminent composers of the latter half of the twentieth century. His work is identified with a diverse style that endeavors to unify disparate elements in a unified manner. He uses materials borrowed freely from many sources, and he is considered a post-modernist in the truest sense. The Sealed Angel (1988) for mixed choir and reed pipe continues the rich choral tradition continued by Rachmaninoff's Vespers (1916) and confirmed by Schnittke's Concerto for Mixed Chorus (1984-85).