Mission
   Goals
   Core Values

   General
   Land Use
   Circulation

   Land Use
   Circulation
   Open Space


   Pedestrian-oriented Campus
   Vehicle System
   Parking Standards
   Drop-Off/Short Term Parking
   CAMBUS
   Open Space System
   Pedestrian/Vehicle Conflicts
   Campus Entrances
   Visual Corridors
   Overlooks
   Potential Building Sites
   Design Guidelines/
      Pre-Design Checklist
   Replace Floor Area Ratio
   Preserve and Protect National
      Register of Historic Places
         Buildings, and Sites
   Identify, Preserve & Protect
      Other Historic Buildings & Sites
   Maintenance Plan
   Campus Statistics
   Hawkins Drive Improvement
   West Campus Loop Road
   Functional Area Recommendations
      Old Capitol
      University Services
      East Residence Halls
      Iowa Center for the Arts and
         the International Center
      Health Sciences/Hospital
      West Residence Halls
      South Melrose
      Sports
      Far West
      Oakdale Campus
   East, West, & Far West Campus
      Development

   The Role of the Campus Planning
      Framework
   The Role of the Campus Planning
      Committee in the Planning
      Process
   The Process For Updating the
      Framework Plan
   The Proposal or Project Review
      Process
   Project Implementation
   Conclusion

   Campus Boundries
   Roads, Streets, & Highways
   Open Space & Green Space
   Parking
   CAMBUS
   Topography
   Slopes
   Drainage
   Soils




   UI Payroll Report - Sept. 1997
   Lot/Ramp Space Inventory-
      Oct. 1997
   Meter Inventory - Oct. 1997
   Service Vehicle Zones -
      East Campus
   Service Vehicle Zones -
      West Campus
   Original Plat of Iowa City
   Workshops - Scheduled by
      Functional Area or
         Participants
   Workshops - Summary of
      Responses By Workshop
   Workshops - Summary of
      Responses
 

Implementation Strategies & Development Guidelines

Planning Principles guide development of the Framework Plan. This report section on Implementation Strategies and Development Guidelines contains general guidelines and specific recommendations. It provides guidance and flexibility for planning new construction and maintaining existing facilities. It addresses fundamental campus-wide systems - access, circulation, transportation, construction, preservation, etc. - and methods of providing continuity to the inherently diverse elements of the campus. It addresses as well, potential further research, data collection, and a formal design guidelines checklist. This section also defines specific strategies and guidelines for the Functional Areas on The University of Iowa campus.

Pedestrian-oriented Campus
Maintain, expand, and emphasize safe, efficient, and effective pedestrian movement through campus. A pedestrian-oriented campus includes an efficient parking and transit system, with limited emergency, service, handicapped, and limited short-term parking.

A key element of most contemporary studies, master plans, and of previous framework plans is the strong emphasis on ensuring safe movement of pedestrians through campus on prioritized, efficient, pedestrian scale walks that have minimized conflicts with vehicles. The "pedestrian-oriented campus" concept promotes connectivity and safety. A pedestrian-oriented campus also is based on balanced parking and an efficient transit system, with emergency, service, handicapped, and limited short-term parking in key locations. Components of a pedestrian-oriented campus are:

Vehicle System
Ensure access for emergency and service vehicles and for those with disabilities to all areas within the context of a pedestrian-oriented campus.

A pedestrian-oriented campus does not eliminate vehicular access and in fact safe, well planned, integrated, and incorporated vehicle access is necessary to ensure pedestrian safety. Students, staff, faculty, visitors, service vehicles, and transit systems all use vehicular routes through campus (See Maps 3 & 4). Emergency vehicles must be able to reach buildings and other locations. Buildings have service needs that must be addressed. Americans with Disabilities Act accessibility from vehicles to buildings is necessary and mandatory. Vehicular presence on the campus will continue and must be accommodated. Components of a vehicle system are:

  • Motorized vehicle system on the outer edge of the West Campus and where possible on the entire campus.
  • Parking lots or parking structures connected to the outer edge vehicle system but not in conflict with pedestrian systems.
  • Motorcycle parking spaces within all parking areas.
  • Controlled/limited service vehicle access routes that minimize conflict with pedestrian movement.
  • Controlled/limited emergency vehicle access routes that may or may not be shared with defined pedestrian routes.
  • Controlled/limited ADA vehicle accesses to all structures and facilities integral with and in minimal conflict with pedestrian movements.
  • CAMBUS system reduces the number of vehicles driving on campus streets and impact of vehicles on campus and is an important component of a pedestrian-oriented system.
Parking Standards
Encourage a system of peripheral parking areas and develop parking standards for the campus including mandatory identification of adequate parking spaces for any proposed new buildings or other facilities.

A pedestrian-oriented campus includes adequate vehicular parking for campus users. Parking contributes to a loss of open space, removes vegetation, contributes to the incremental erosion of the quality of the campus environment, but is an important and necessary component of a pedestrian-oriented campus. Appropriate location of parking contributes to a unified campus that operates efficiently and is convenient for students, faculty, staff, and visitors. As noted in information from the Parking and Transportation Department, it is neither possible nor desirable to meet all the access needs of students, faculty, or staff through parking facilities due to limited land resources, other access options, and the desire to develop and maintain a pedestrian-oriented campus (See Maps 5 & 6). The pedestrian-oriented campus concept suggests that parking facilities be located on the campus periphery so intrusions of cars into the campus core will be minimized.

Allowable exceptions include existing parking ramps and situations where nearby parking must be available to certain facilities, such as some hospital functions. However, even the exceptions should first assume parking is at the campus periphery and justify moving spaces closer to the facility. Even then, safe pedestrian movement takes precedence over convenient parking spaces.

In addition to locating parking facilities to the periphery of the campus, a continuing issue is identifying parking needs and supply of parking generated by construction of new facilities. New construction has parking implications and solutions. If a new building is constructed, part of the design process must identify where parking is for that structure. The campus is an academic institution, not a parking lot.

Drop-Off/Short Term Parking
Identify locations where temporary parking spaces, passenger drop-off sites, and other close to facility vehicular spaces might be located to provide short-term parking within the context of a pedestrian-oriented campus.

A pedestrian-oriented campus means students, staff, faculty, visitors, service vehicles, and transit systems must have emergency, service, short term, and handicapped access to buildings and facilities. Campus users cannot park at the front door of every building all the time, but accommodating nearby parking for limited, specific reasons and times will ensure success of the pedestrian-oriented system. Buildings have service needs that must be addressed. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility from vehicles to buildings is necessary and mandatory. Students, staff, faculty, and visitors occasionally have materials in their vehicles that must be carried into buildings. CAMBUS access close to building entrances and areas where building users can be dropped off by vehicle will also support the pedestrian-oriented system.

Identify campus locations where temporary (e.g., 15-20 minute) parking spaces, passenger drop-off sites, and other transitory, close to a facility vehicular spaces might be located to provide short-term parking access. All spaces and vehicular accesses to those spaces must be subordinate to and not conflict with pedestrian systems. All such spaces also must be monitored and policed on a consistent basis to discourage abuse.

CAMBUS
Review CAMBUS routes, times, and operations to ensure support of the pedestrian-oriented campus concept. Enhance routes and consider alternate vehicles/modes to allow pedestrians to travel to areas of campus beyond a ten-minute walk in the least amount of time with the minimum of vehicle conflicts.

CAMBUS is an integral part of the University transportation system and the pedestrian-oriented campus concept. CAMBUS reduces the number of cars on campus by connecting remote student residences and remote parking areas to the campus. The system supports parking facilities on the periphery of campus so fewer cars intrude into the campus core.

The extent, routes, and hours of operation of the CAMBUS system should be reviewed and judged on the ability of the system to support the pedestrian-oriented concept. For instance, if students are expected to use remote parking areas (e.g., the Finkbine Commuter Lot) then CAMBUS operations should connect the remote areas to the campus during all the hours campus facilities are open. Furthermore, routes should be enhanced wherever possible and alternative modes should be considered to allow pedestrians to travel to campus areas beyond a ten-minute walk.

Open Space System
Organize a defined Open Space System to link diverse campus elements and create a unified, pedestrian-oriented campus.

A concern raised by campus users is the importance of linking the diverse architecture, land uses, and other elements of the campus. Architectural diversity is described by most as desirable or at least acceptable, but creating continuity that ties the campus into a unified entity is critical. In addition, preservation of existing natural features, access to other campus areas, and safe pedestrian walkways are all important elements of a unified campus.

An Open Space System is an integral component of the Sesquicentennial Campus Planning Framework Plan and is used to link diverse campus elements and create a unified, pedestrian-oriented campus. Open Space provides valuable structured or natural environments among the architectural elements of the campus. Key elements include:

The Open Space elements shown on maps 7 & 8 delineate major existing and currently proposed open spaces on campus. The maps show major pedestrian connections between and among open spaces and structures. Components include:

East Campus

  • A grid system of pedestrian-oriented routes along urban streets and pedestrian walkways.
  • A river edge pedestrian system that includes a future connection north to Park Road and to the Mayflower Residence Hall.
  • A system of pedestrian-oriented routes that connect from the grid and river edge systems to major open space areas not on the grid or along the river.
  • Connection from the north side of Burlington Street to future development south of Burlington with an emphasis on safe pedestrian movement as part of the design solution.
  • Five Iowa River crossing connections to the West Campus at Burlington Street bridge, Iowa Avenue bridge, Iowa Memorial Union pedestrian bridge between the Union and Art, Hancher pedestrian bridge from north of North Hall to south of Hancher Auditorium, and along the Park Road bridge.
  • Future gathering location at the proposed River Terrace between the Iowa River and the Memorial Union.
  • Future gathering site between the proposed building south of EPB and the proposed building west of the Library between the river and railroad tracks.
  • Future pedestrian connection to the gathering site between the proposed building south of EPB and the proposed building west of the Library between the river and railroad tracks.
  • Gathering site north of the Memorial Union.
  • Gathering site northwest of the Communication Study Building.
  • Gathering site south of the Library.
  • Historic open lawn and gathering location (Hubbard Park) south of the Memorial Union.
  • Historical - Cultural open space within the Pentacrest block.
  • Linear - Pedestrian space east of the Lindquist Center along Capitol Street.
  • Linear - College Street Walkway.
  • Linear - Pedestrian space on the Cleary Walkway.
  • Linear - Riverine space along the east bank of the Iowa River.
  • Linear - Linear route from Capitol Street to north of the Library.
  • Two campus entrances.
  • Wooded slopes between the Iowa River and North Hall, Stanley Hall, and the Presidents Residence.
  • The Arboretum east of the Iowa River below the President's Residence.
West Campus
  • A river edge pedestrian system that includes future connection between Burlington Street and the intersection of Myrtle Avenue and South Riverside Drive.
  • A system of pedestrian-oriented routes that connect from the open space and river edge systems to other major open space areas.
  • A system of pedestrian-oriented routes within existing and proposed open spaces.
  • Development of a pedestrian bridge over US Highway 6 between International Center and proposed parking ramp north of the Health Sciences/Hospital Campus.
  • Development of the proposed pedestrian bridge over US Highway 6 as major campus entry feature, not simply a utilitarian road crossing.
  • Four campus entrances beyond the US Highway 6 pedestrian bridge entrance.
  • Future gathering site east of proposed Medical Education Building.
  • Gathering site beneath the water tower south of the Speech & Hearing Center.
  • Gathering site south of Carver Hawkeye Arena.
  • Linear - Pedestrian corridor between Dental Science and proposed Medical Education Building.
  • Linear - Riverine space along the west bank of the Iowa River.
  • Open lawn and play fields southwest of the Baseball Stadium.
  • Open lawn south of Dental Science.
  • Pedestrian connection between Dental Science and Health Sciences/Hospital Campus along the proposed to be closed section of Newton Road.
  • Pedestrian connection to and incorporation of the proposed Iowa River Garden & Greenway, including proposed wetlands, south of Hancher.
  • Pedestrian connection to future building east of Myrtle Avenue parking.
  • Pedestrian connection to proposed building northeast of Hancher.
  • Pedestrian connection to proposed building northeast of International Center.
  • Pedestrian connection to Ronald McDonald House and adjoining 20 acre wooded hilltop.
  • Pedestrian connection to the Finkbine commuter parking lot.
  • Pedestrian connection to the proposed residence hall northeast of the Quadrangle.
  • Pedestrian connections to Lower Finkbine Athletic Fields and west to Hawkeye Drive Apartments.
  • Pedestrian connections to proposed overlooks on the bluffs above the Iowa River.
  • Prairie/Woodland/Wetland area west of Hawkins Drive.
  • Proposed pedestrian spaces among residence halls and along Grand Avenue.
  • Reduction of vehicular routes and conversion to pedestrian routes of areas within the Quadrangle, Rienow Hall, Slater Hall, and Hillcrest.
  • Twenty acre wooded hilltop west of Carver Hawkeye.
  • Wooded slopes between the Iowa River and the International Center, Nursing Building, Quadrangle Residence Hall area, Boyd Law Building, and Myrtle Avenue parking lot.
Far West Campus
  • Preserve open space along Clear Creek.
  • Preserve wooded area along Clear Creek and allow only a carefully sited future bike trail within this sensitive area.
  • Preserve and protect Mormon Handcart site (land owned by the university but the site is maintained by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints) along Clear Creek.
  • Preserve and protect existing identified archaeological sites within the Clear Creek corridor.
  • Open space along the utility easement east of Hawkeye Drive Apartments.
  • Open space beneath and adjoining the three towers west of Mormon Trek Boulevard south of Hawkeye Park.
  • Pedestrian connection from the future railroad right-of-way trail along Clear Creek.
  • Pedestrian connection along Mormon Trek Boulevard to near Iowa City West High School.
  • Pedestrian connection between Hawkeye Court and Hawkeye Drive areas.
Pedestrian/Vehicle Conflicts
Identify existing and future pedestrian/vehicle conflict points and determine solutions.

Conflicts between the pedestrian-oriented system and vehicular routes are shown on map 9. Future segments of the pedestrian system are delineated as well. Conflicts on the Far West Campus are shown on map 10 and East and West Campus conflicts include:

East Campus

  • Along the connection to the Mayflower at Dubuque Street in front of the Mayflower and at the Park Road crossing.
  • The Cleary Walkway has vehicular conflicts at its intersection with Market Street and Jefferson Street.
  • Along the north side of Iowa Avenue where pedestrian route crosses Madison, Dubuque, and North Clinton Streets.
  • On Madison Street from Cleary Walkway to the Iowa Advanced Technology Lab via Market and from Cleary to the Memorial Union via Jefferson.
  • At the southwest corner of the Memorial Union at the service drive.
  • Along the river where the pedestrian route crosses Iowa Avenue to the English Philosophy Building.
  • At the Washington Street intersections with Capitol Street and South Madison Street.
  • At the Burlington Street intersections with South Madison and the service drive east of the Water Plant.
  • A future conflict at the proposed service drive and the pedestrian system connection to the gathering site between the proposed building south of EPB and the proposed building west of the Library.
West Campus
  • At the Riverside Drive pedestrian crossing between the International Center and Art.
  • Along the river walk where it intersects with Burlington Street.
  • At the south end of the river walk where it crosses South Riverside Drive to connect to the proposed building east of the Myrtle Avenue parking lot.
  • South of the proposed US Highway pedestrian crossing and Parking Structure where the pedestrian route crosses realigned Newton Road.
  • Service drive conflict at the northeast corner of Bowen Science.
  • Pedestrian access across Grand Avenue between the Fieldhouse and Quadrangle both existing and in future redevelopment of the pedestrian spaces within the Quadrangle, Rienow, Slater, and Hillcrest.
  • Byington Road crossing at existing Grand Avenue and in future redevelopment of the pedestrian spaces within the Quadrangle, Rienow, Slater, and Hillcrest.
  • Parking lot and service drive crossing south of Boyd that connects to Myrtle Avenue parking lot.
  • Along the narrow walk between the Dental Science parking lot and drive and the lot to the south.
  • Across Elliot Drive southeast of Carver Hawkeye Arena.
  • Across the Carver Hawkeye parking lot to Ronald McDonald house.
  • South of the future pedestrian route between Dental Science and the Health Sciences/Hospital Campus is a connection that crosses Parking Ramp entry drives.
  • At the intersection of Hawkins Drive and Stadium Drive.
  • At the vehicular entry to Hospital Parking Ramp #3.
  • At the crossing along Hawkins Drive between Carver Hawkeye and the Baseball Stadium.
  • At the crossing of the drive between Hawkins Road and the Finkbine Commuter lot.
Conflicts between the pedestrian-oriented system and vehicular routes can be reduced by:
  • Designing with a priority to pedestrians over vehicles.
  • Continuing pedestrian paving surfaces through vehicular routes.
  • Warning pedestrians and drivers of conflicts through signs, signals, changes in paving texture, and other design elements.
  • New development begins with the needs of pedestrian movement a design priority over other systems.
  • Paving surfaces along pedestrian routes need to be wide enough to accommodate all users.
  • Paving surfaces along pedestrian routes need to meet Americans with Disabilities Act standards.
  • Widen existing walks to accommodate pedestrians movement.
Campus Entrances
Identify significant entrance points to the University and develop entrance features at those locations to provide a sense of arrival at the campus.

Entrances are locations along edges of the University where distinctive signage, lighting, paving, plant material, and other site elements can introduce the campus to those entering. Entrances typically are designed as vehicular entry points but also function as pedestrian gates as well. Entry points are sometimes very specific locations at distinct campus edges while other entries are more vague and less distinctly separate from surrounding areas. East Campus entrances are less distinct than those on the West Campus and Far West Campus entries should be developed in the future as that area develops (See Maps 11 & 12). Major campus entry sites are:

East Campus

  • Intersection of Burlington Street and Capitol Street.
  • Intersection of Church Street and Dubuque Street adjoining the Presidents Residence.
  • There is a ceremonial campus entrance at the intersection of Iowa Avenue and North Clinton Street along the east edge of the Pentacrest.
West Campus
  • Intersection of South Riverside Drive and Myrtle Avenue.
  • Intersection of US Highway 6 and Hawkins Drive west of the twenty acre wooded hilltop.
  • Melrose Avenue intersection with the railroad overpass at the southwest corner of campus.
  • Along US Highway 6 beneath the future pedestrian overpass connecting the proposed Health Sciences/Hospital Campus with the International Center.
  • Intersection of Riverside Drive and Park Road northwest of Hancher.
Far West Campus
  • Intersection of Melrose Avenue and Mormon Trek Boulevard.
  • A future entrance (to be developed when sports complex west of Mormon Trek Boulevard is begun) at the intersection of US Highway 6 and Mormon Trek Boulevard.
  • A future entrance at the west edge of the Far West Campus along Melrose Avenue.
Visual Corridors
Identify significant Visual Corridors and protect from view-blocking intrusions. Enhance views to the Iowa River so it serves as a unifying element between the East and West Campuses rather than a dividing element.

Visual Corridors, protected from intrusions, maintain connections among campus elements. Corridors may link streets, buildings, and walkways to the Iowa River or preserve vistas to the Pentacrest (See Map 13). Major visual corridors to preserve and to create in the future are:

  • Davenport Street between the Iowa River and North Clinton.
  • Market Street between the Iowa River and North Clinton Street.
  • Jefferson Street from the Iowa River through Clinton Street.
  • Four directions from the Pentacrest - east along Iowa Avenue, south along south Capitol Street, north along North Capitol and the Cleary Walkway, and west across the Iowa River to Bowen Science.
  • Along Washington Street from the Iowa River through the future open space between the proposed building south of EPB and the proposed building west of the Library between the river and railroad tracks and through Clinton Street.
  • Along Burlington Street from the Iowa River to Clinton Street.
  • From Riverside Drive to the Iowa River along the north edge of Hancher.
  • From Riverside Drive to the Iowa River through the Iowa River Garden & Greenway.
  • Between the Theatre Building and Alumni Center from Riverside Drive to the Iowa River.
  • Between the Museum of Art and the Art Building from Riverside Drive to the Iowa River.
  • From the Fieldhouse to the Iowa River along Grand Avenue.
  • From Dental Science to the Health Sciences/Hospital Campus.
Overlooks
Identify, preserve, and enhance significant Overlooks on campus.

Overlook sites provide unique distant or connecting views between campus areas. Overlooks can be as simple as a clear view along a sidewalk or can be formalized spaces that include walls, maps, seating, signs, and other elements. By definition, Overlooks tend to be high points with distant views of lower areas and can be typified by the potential Overlook site near the southeast corner of Westlawn. This location has a distant view down to the Iowa River and could be developed as a distinct, dramatic, memorable, and formal stop along the campus open space system (See Map 13). Major overlooks to be developed are:

  • Southeast corner of Westlawn overlooking the Iowa River.
  • Northeast corner of Hillcrest overlooking the Iowa River.
  • Southeast corner of Boyd Law building overlooking the Iowa River.
  • Adjoining the Iowa River Garden & Greenway overlooking the Iowa River.
Potential Building Sites
Identify potential building sites on campus.

A number of potential building sites have been identified in existing planning documents. Identifying potential sites helps define potential areas for structures but also allows planning for connections to the open space system and enhancement of the pedestrian-oriented campus concept (See Maps 14 & 15). Identified building sites include:

East Campus

  • South of English Philosophy Building.
  • West of the Library between the Iowa River and the railroad tracks.
  • North of the Library west of Communications Studies Building.
  • Southwest of the Library within the existing parking lot.
  • Numerous sites south of Burlington Street. (See South of Burlington Study, January 31, 1997, Herbert-Lewis-Kruse-Blunk.)
  • Southwest of Van Allen Hall. (Under construction)
  • Lindquist Center - Possible future addition to Lindquist adjoining the northwest corner of the existing building.
  • Seashore Hall - Areas within the center of the existing building are noted as "in poor condition and need to be demolished."
West Campus
  • Northeast of Hancher.
  • Northeast of the International Center, west of Riverside Drive.
  • Medical Education & Biomedical Research Building replacing Student Health building.
  • Parking Ramp west of Westlawn, north of realigned Newton Road.
  • Infill building within existing Medical Education Building.
  • Addition on east side of Westlawn. (Under construction)
  • Residence Hall replacing the parking lot northeast of the Quad Residence Hall.
  • East of Myrtle Avenue parking lot.
  • Melrose Avenue Parking Ramp - Proposed addition to Ramp #90 east of the existing ramp along the south side of the Fieldhouse Addition.
Far West Campus
  • Sites within the area west of Mormon Trek Boulevard, north of Melrose Avenue, east of Hawkeye Drive Apartments, and south of Hawkeye Park.
  • Sites within the area west of Hawkeye Court Apartments, north of Hawkeye Park, and south of the wooded area to be preserved and protected along Clear Creek.
  • Sites within the area west of Hawkeye Drive Apartments, north of Melrose Avenue, and south of the wooded area to be preserved and protected along Clear Creek.
Design Guidelines/Pre-Design Checklist
Develop a Design Guidelines document and a Pre-Schematic Design Plan Checklist to ensure proposed designs address University goals.

To ensure proposed new construction meets University goals and guidelines, develop a Design Guidelines document and a Pre-Design Checklist. This will allow potential building designers to have applicable information early in the design process. The Guidelines should not mandate strict compliance to a narrow set of design solutions but should communicate concepts compatible with the goals of the Sesquicentennial Campus Planning Framework Plan. The Checklist allows staff and the Campus Design Committee to have a basis for review of a proposal. Possible items to be included in the Design Guidelines and Pre-Design Checklist are:

Guidelines:

  • Identify how the proposed facility is compatible with other facilities in the Functional Area.
  • Identify how parking needs generated by the proposed facility are met.
  • Identify connections to the CAMBUS system.
  • Identify any short-term parking spaces.
  • Identify a long term maintenance and replacement schedule.
  • Identify direct connection from the proposed facility to existing or proposed pedestrian system that does not have a conflict with vehicular traffic.
  • Ensure that pedestrian connections are integral with the successful design of all new structures and are not afterthoughts
  • Specify energy efficiency, functionality, durability, minimum maintenance, plus character.
  • Identify significant existing vegetation and natural features and define they will be preserved.
Document the following systems on and adjoining the site:
  • Existing natural features. (particularly existing vegetation)
  • Existing pedestrian and vehicular systems.
  • Existing utility systems.
Identify applicable planning documents that influence the proposed designed:
  • Burge Hall - Preliminary Site Plan
  • Campus Urban Forest Study.
  • College Street Pedestrian Walkway
  • Iowa Center for the Arts Campus Landscape Master Plan.
  • Iowa River Corridor Study.
  • Others as identified by Facilities Services Group and the Campus Planning Committee.
  • Pentacrest Master Landscape Development Plan.
  • Residence Services West Campus Master Plan.
  • South Campus Entry - Master Plan.
  • South of Burlington Street Study - Master Planning Report.
  • University of Iowa Athletic Facilities Long Range Plan.
  • University of Iowa Bicycle Parking Study.
  • University of Iowa Campus Lighting Strategy.
  • University of Iowa Health Sciences Campus Plan.
  • University of Iowa Oakdale Campus - Master Plan.
  • University of Iowa Sports & Recreation Facilities Long Range Master Plan Revisions.
Replace Floor Area Ratio
Replace the Floor Area Ratio (ratio between the footprint/number of floors of a building and the site) analysis of proposed buildings with a flexible compatibility analysis. New buildings should be compatible with existing structures within the Functional Area.

Previous Campus Planning Framework Plans used Floor Area Ratio (FAR) to determine compatibility of proposed structures into campus functional areas or neighborhoods. The FAR principal established a ratio between the footprint/number of floors of a building and the site available for that building. By setting FAR standards for various campus areas, any new structure conceptually would have to fall within that ratio to be deemed appropriate for that site.

Floor Area Ratio is an anachronistic planning concept carried over from the 1960s no longer in favor with most planners. The FAR concept was well intentioned but not as precisely measurable, particularly on large campus sites, nor as flexible as necessary in the reality of site development. For instance, defining the boundary of a proposed building site can be difficult to determine. For The University of Iowa, a more design oriented, building massing related method of establishing compatibility is recommended. That is, it is more important for a proposed structure to be compatible with the scale and mass of adjoining structures (particularly within each Campus Functional Area) than to meet an arbitrary numerical formula applied to an area of campus. It also is important to recognize, maintain, enhance, and continue the differences between the East Campus and West Campus areas of The University of Iowa reflected in architecture, site, orientation, traffic flow, parking, and other elements. See the East & West Campus Development discussion earlier.

Preserve and Protect National Register of Historic Places Buildings and Sites
Preserve and protect buildings and sites on the National Register of Historic Places and identify potential Register inclusion of other historic campus areas.

Preservation of significant historic and natural features is essential in preserving the campus environment. Preservation can take a formal approach by including significant features on the National Register of Historic Places. This is the official list of the Nation's cultural resources worthy of preservation. Authorized under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Register is part of a nation-wide program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect historic and archeological resources. There are currently two campus sites listed on the National Historic Register:

Other sites on campus may be eligible for National Register status. Potential sites include:
    Mormon Handcart Site (a potential combination natural & historic/cultural site)
    Kuhl House/Iowa Press (on Park Road west of Parklawn)
    Bowman House (at southeast corner of Clinton and Bloomington)
    Hutchinson Quarry
These resources are fragile and care must be taken to retain the integrity of the sites. Campus use and public visitation introduce problems of security and wear and tear. Two documents are recommended for review and guidance in management of historic sites:
    American Association of Museums, Historic Sites Committee. An Annotated Bibliography for the Development and Operation of Historic Sites. Washington, DC: Association, 1982.

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior. "Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines." Federal Register, September 19, 1983.

Identify, Preserve, and Protect Other Historic Buildings and Sites
Identify, preserve and protect buildings and sites not appropriate for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places but historically significant to the campus.

Develop criteria to identify and methods to protect other campus resources significant in the historic context of the campus. One resource to review is Sesquicentennial Heritage Walk Tour Guide made possible by The University of Iowa Sesquicentennial Steering Committee. It contains a description of a number of East Campus historical sites (along with geologic and significant tree sites) as a beginning point for site identification. Potential criteria include:

Level of Significance - The level of significance can be evaluated using three elements.

  • Ability of the resource to call attention to a specific period of time or an event in history.
  • Totality of the existing or potential educational experience, including the ability of the resource to provide a clear picture of the event or specific time in history.
  • The degree of uniqueness of the resource compared to similar resources.
Integrity of the Site
  • The level at which the site adheres to its original character, including main structures, accessory buildings, and landscape features also helps determine significance. Restoration, reconstruction, or renovation not in keeping with the style or period of the resource are negative factors in assessing overall integrity.
Maintenance Plan
To ensure the long-term integrity of campus facilities, develop a maintenance plan for buildings and grounds that 1) identifies the purpose, goals, and objectives of maintenance, 2) delineates specific periodic maintenance procedures, and 3) identifies funding implications of maintenance. Establish a maintenance plan, schedule, and funding to preserve the integrity of existing buildings and sites. Too often delayed maintenance leads to a situation where deterioration reaches a crises point and a facility that might have been viable with timely maintenance suddenly is deemed unsalvageable. This loss of the facility has a cost to the University, not just a financial loss but the loss of historic fabric.

Campus Statistics
Collect statistics on campus population, enrollment, etc. to establish a basis, determine a sustainability level for the University, and identify need for future data.

Collecting information on population, enrollment, staffing, and other statistics are important in evaluating current and future development proposals. Statistical trends, for instance, may help decide the necessity of or non-necessity of a proposed development. As an example, if current trends continue, near future student population at the University probably will not change much from today's numbers. This has implications for housing, facilities, classrooms, CAMBUS schedules, and a myriad of other elements on campus. It also may increase the importance of upgrading a facility simply to maintain the enrollment figures and not experience a decline. Knowing the trends will aid in all decision making.

Hawkins Drive Improvement
Investigate the concept of realigning Hawkins Drive to a more southerly edge of campus route and redefining the former alignment area to a pedestrian-oriented open space. Include all stakeholders in a process to determine the issues involved. Issues must be satisfactorily resolved before the concept is incorporated into the plan.

There is an opportunity on the West Campus to address a potential long range change that could enhance vehicle movement, consolidate open space, add continuity to the pedestrian system, and create potential building sites. It is an opportunity that embraces the core concepts of the Sesquicentennial Campus Planning Framework Plan, particularly the "pedestrian-oriented campus" concept and minimization of vehicular intrusion while maintaining service, emergency, and other critical access. It is an opportunity that merits further research to maximize the potential benefits and address the many concerns that naturally arise with the potential of change. Stakeholders in the potential rerouting should help define the issues involved and resolution of those issues before the concept is incorporated into the plan.

The proposed change removes Hawkins Drive from the center of West Campus, realigns Hawkins to a more southerly edge of campus route, and alters the central area to a pedestrian-oriented open space with new building sites along the edges of the pedestrian space. Hawkins Drive would connect at the existing US 6 intersection, follow the current route around the 20 acre wooded hilltop, align south of the electric sub-station and field hockey field, connect through Parking Lot 43 south of the Recreation Building and intersect with Melrose Avenue south of Kinnick Stadium. It also would connect to existing parking west of Carver-Hawkeye, Area Commuter Lot 75, and remaining revised parking in Lot 43. The existing Hawkins Drive/Melrose Avenue intersection would also remain to provide vehicular access to the three Hospital ramps currently approached from this intersection.

New pedestrian-oriented spaces would connect Carver-Hawkeye, Dental Science, Hospital School, and the pedestrian system within the proposed Health Science Campus and would eliminate vehicular conflicts. The change would eliminate vehicular conflicts, provide new building sites and parking facilities along the edges of the pedestrian space, consolidate a number of underutilized and inaccessible open spaces, provide game-day pedestrian access and activity spaces around Kinnick while maintaining needed vehicular access to the stadium, and improve pedestrian safety while maintaining service and emergency access.

There are many issues to be addressed. Costs, budget, environmental impact, and timing are always concerns. The opportunity, however, should be addressed (See Map 16).

West Campus Loop Road
Review the existing West Campus loop road system that includes a portion of Highway 6 and Melrose Avenue that are not within the boundaries of the campus.

The non-University owned streets are an integral part of the West Campus loop road system and it may be a concern that these vehicular routes are not University controlled. If it is a problem, solutions should be pursued. Potential solutions include:

Functional Area Recommendations
Identify specific recommendations for each campus functional area.

To facilitate specific project planning, the 1990 Campus Planning Framework divided the campus (actually the East Campus and most of the West Campus) into seven functional areas based on the 1978 "Lindberg Report" (As noted in the 1990 plan, the Lindberg Report was the first documented "campus plan" that incorporated the concept of "an incremental plan that was flexible enough to be responsive to newly-developing needs but achieved and maintained cohesiveness by working within several components of a framework that could be developed and applied over extended periods of time.") The 1990 Framework divided the areas "according to functional and programmatic interdependencies, adjacencies and compatibility." The seven areas were:

    Old Capitol Area
    University Service Area
    East and West Residence Halls
    Iowa Center for the Arts and the International Center
    Health Center Campus
    South Melrose Area
    Sports Area
The Far West Campus and Oakdale functional areas have been added since the 1990 Framework.

The following report section identifies specific recommendations based on existing conditions, existing plans, suggestions and requests from staff, faculty, students, and the public for the various functional areas identified in the Lindberg Report and the 1990 Framework Plan with a few modifications. First, the "East and West Residence Halls Functional Area" is divided into two separate areas based on the knowledge that although uses are similar, the two areas are on opposite sides of the Iowa River and in dramatically different surroundings. Second, the Far West Campus and Oakdale Functional Areas are included in the recommendations. This results in ten functional areas:

East Campus Functional Areas

    Old Capitol Area
    University Services Area
    East Residence Halls
West Campus Functional Areas
    Iowa Center for the Arts and the International Center
    Health Sciences/Hospital (Formerly known as Health Center Campus Functional Area)
    West Residence Halls
    South Melrose Area
    Sports Area
Other Functional Areas
    Far West Campus Area
    Oakdale Campus Area
Several campus areas are not within the 1990 functional area boundaries. This may be because of campus boundary changes, a lack of precision in mapping boundaries, or simple oversight. Whatever the reason, all areas within the campus boundary should be within an existing or future functional area. Boundaries of several functional areas, therefore, have been revised to include the non-included areas (See Maps
1 & 2). Revisions to the 1990 functional areas now include:
  • The President's Residence, the wooded area and shoreline between President's Residence and the Iowa River, and the Dey House have been added to the Old Capitol Functional Area.
  • The area along Park Road west of Riverside Drive and the Iowa Center for the Arts has been added to Iowa Center for the Arts and the International Center Functional Area.
  • The wooded ravine north of the Quadrangle has been added to the Old Capitol Functional Area.
  • The parking lot along the edge of the wooded ravine north of the Quadrangle has been added to West Residence Halls.
  • The west shoreline area of the river between Myrtle Avenue and the CRANDIC bridge over Riverside Drive has been added to three functional areas. The shoreline south of Burlington added to the South Melrose Functional Area, the shoreline between Iowa Avenue and Burlington added to the Old Capitol Functional Area, and the shoreline north of Iowa Avenue and south of the CRANDIC bridge added to the Iowa Center for the Arts and the International Center Functional Area.
  • Some of the areas south and east of the University Services Functional Area have been added to the University Services Functional Area.
  • There are several off-campus buildings east and south of the University Services Functional Area that are not part of the Framework Plan due to their separation from the main campus. Since they are small enclaves surrounded by Iowa City, their planning and development should be specific to their individual location.
  • The west boundary of the Sports area is vague and is shown differently on different maps. The entire sports complex west of Hawkins Drive and south of Highway 6, and Finkbine golf course have not been shown on previous functional area maps. Some maps identify the sports complex in the West Campus, not in the Far West Campus, and since functional area maps tend to stop near Carver-Hawkeye Basketball Arena, this leaves the sports complex between functional areas. The Sports Functional Area has been expanded to include the twenty acre wooded slope west of Carver Hawkeye, the lower Finkbine athletic fields, and Finkbine Golf Course, and all have been added to the West Campus Area.
  • The Consolidated Business Services Building and ten acre site across Old Highway 218 from the Municipal Airport should undergo a planning process to determine appropriate use of the site. When completed, recommendations should be added to the Campus Planning Framework.
  • The Health Center Campus Functional Area name has been changed to Health Sciences/Hospital Functional Area.
  • Minor adjustments have been made to many functional area boundaries to make them more closely align with campus boundaries.
Old Capitol Functional Area
This functional area has been expanded to include most of the East Campus north of Burlington. It extends from the Iowa River to Spence Labs on the east, and from the Lindquist Center to the President's Residence on the north. It is the heart of the urban fabric of the campus and adjoins downtown Iowa City. The Old Capitol Functional Area includes the Pentacrest and is the only area that extends across the Iowa river. This functional area includes the Quad ravine and the west bank of the river between Iowa Avenue and Burlington Street. It contains most of the Liberal Arts programs as well as the colleges of Business Administration, Education and Engineering, and is the location of administration and academic support facilities such as the Library, Student Union, and the Computer Center.

Various studies outlined later in this report are applicable in the Old Capitol area. The River Corridor Study focuses on a sustainable river-edge, addresses maintenance and ecological implications of flooding, modifies the river edge for pedestrian circulation and reclaims the river as an important open space corridor. The College Street Pedestrian Walkway plan shows site development along College Street between the Communication Center and Engineering Building Addition on the north and the Lindquist Center on the south with a switch-back handicap access route from Capitol Street to Madison Street. The Campus Lighting Strategy identifies safety, energy efficiency, and light pollution issues and address unity and continuity issues by recommending a program of light fixture coordination. Unity and continuity also are addressed in the Urban Forest Study. The Bicycle Study promotes bicycles as important and beneficial modes of transportation, places safety of bicyclists above convenience of motorists, and places safety of pedestrians above convenience of bicyclists. The Pentacrest Master Plan is twelve years old and may need to be revisited.

Future development in the Old Capitol Area should follow the existing urban character of the East Campus to maintain and emphasize the architectural, site, orientation, traffic flow, parking, and other physical differences between the East and West Campus areas. Buildings, walkways, open spaces, and other elements should blend with the grid of existing streets. It also is important to maintain respect for the Pentacrest by ensuring that proposed structures in the Old Capitol Functional Area close to the Pentacrest are similar in height and massing but no higher than the Pentacrest structures.

There are several Visual Corridors listed below to protect and enhance in the Old Capitol area. Perhaps the most important corridors, though, are the four that extend from the Pentacrest that provide important visual links between this major historical campus asset and the rest of campus and the surrounding community.

  • Davenport Street between the Iowa River and North Clinton.
  • Market Street between the Iowa River and North Clinton Street.
  • Jefferson Street from the Iowa River through Clinton Street.
  • Four directions from the Pentacrest - east along Iowa Avenue, south along South Capitol Street, north along North Capitol and the Cleary Walkway, and west across the Iowa River to Bowen Science.
  • Along Washington Street from the Iowa River through the future open space between the proposed building south of EPB and the proposed building west of the Library between the river and railroad tracks and through Clinton Street.
  • Along Burlington Street from the Iowa River to Clinton Street.
Three locations are appropriate for campus entry features in the Old Capitol Functional Area. The green space at the northwest corner of the Burlington and Capitol Street intersection provides an ideal site for distinctive signage, lighting, paving, plant material, and other elements that can introduce the campus, particularly to those in vehicles. Burlington is an important street, carries a high traffic load and is one of the Iowa River bridges connecting the East and West Campus. A second location, at the Church and Dubuque Streets intersection, also is a significant entrance point to the University. It is a vehicular entry point but functions as a pedestrian gateway as well. Its proximity to the President's Residence makes this site ideal for a campus entry feature. A third location, at the intersection of Iowa Avenue and North Clinton Street along the east edge of the Pentacrest, functions as a ceremonial entrance to the university and provides pedestrian access and visual access to the Old Capitol and the university. Potential entry features here should be carefully coordinated to fit within the historic fabric of the Pentacrest.

Potential building sites have been identified in existing planning documents. An important site in the Old Capitol Functional Area is in the parking lot south of the English Philosophy Building and west of the Library between the Iowa River and the railroad tracks. Two structures are shown in this area with an important open space and visual corridor between the buildings along the extended alignment of Washington Street. Additional sites are north of the Library west of the Communications Studies Building and within the parking area southwest of the Library. Other sites include southwest of Van Allen Hall (currently under construction), possible future addition to Lindquist adjoining the northwest corner of the existing building, Engineering Building (currently under construction), and areas within the center of the Seashore Hall are noted as "in poor condition and need to be demolished."

Several open spaces and pedestrian routes are delineated in the grid dominated Old Capitol Functional Area that help link diverse campus elements and create a unified, pedestrian-oriented campus. Most are on a grid of pedestrian-oriented routes along urban streets with routes that connect to the river edge and major open spaces. Some are historical spaces such as Hubbard Park south of the Union and the areas within the Pentacrest. Existing gathering sites include areas north of the Union, northwest of the Communication Building, and south of the Library and future sites are proposed at the River Terrace at the Union, between the proposed buildings between EPB, Library, and the river. Open spaces and pedestrian routes are listed below:

  • A grid system of pedestrian-oriented routes along urban streets and pedestrian walkways.
  • A river edge pedestrian system from Burlington Street to west of the President's Residence.
  • A system of pedestrian-oriented routes that connect from the grid and river edge systems to major open space areas not on the grid or along the river.
  • Iowa River crossing connections to the West Campus at Burlington Street bridge, Iowa Avenue bridge, and pedestrian bridge between the Union and Art.
  • Future gathering location at the proposed River Terrace between the Iowa River and the Memorial Union.
  • Future gathering site between the proposed building south of EPB and the proposed building west of the Library between the river and railroad tracks.
  • Future pedestrian connection to the gathering site between the proposed building south of EPB and the proposed building west of the Library between the river and railroad tracks.
  • Gathering site north of the Memorial Union.
  • Gathering site northwest of the Communication Study Building.
  • Gathering site south of the Library.
  • Wooded slopes between the Iowa River and North Hall, Stanley Hall, and the Presidents Residence.
  • The Arboretum east of the Iowa River below the President's Residence.
  • Historic open lawn and gathering location (Hubbard Park) south of the Memorial Union.
  • Historical - Cultural open space within the Pentacrest block.
  • Linear - Pedestrian space east of the Lindquist Center along Capitol Street.
  • Linear - Pedestrian space along the proposed College Street Walkway.
  • Linear - Pedestrian space on the T. Anne Cleary Walkway.
  • Linear - Riverine space along the east bank of the Iowa River.
There are several conflict points between pedestrian routes and vehicular traffic within the existing and proposed segments of the open space system in the Old Capitol Functional Area. Many of these cannot be addressed by closing streets to traffic so other means, such as traffic signals, warning signs, pedestrian paving textures, and others should be reviewed.

University Services Functional Area
This functional area includes University property south of Burlington Avenue and the Water Plant north of Burlington along the Iowa River. The area is used largely to house Operations and Maintenance and utility functions such as campus shops, motor pool, general stores, and parking.

Five studies are applicable to the University Services area. The Urban Forest Study, River Corridor Study, Bicycle Study, and Campus Lighting Strategy focus on campus wide unity and continuity issues with applicability to this functional area. The South of Burlington Study analyzes current and conceptual future land use uses including a 1500 car parking ramp, service building to consolidate facilities support functions, chiller plant to expand the chilled water capacity, and future academic/research building sites.

Future development in the University Services Area should follow the existing urban character of the East Campus to maintain and emphasize the architectural, site, orientation, traffic flow, parking, and other physical features of the East Campus. Development of buildings, open spaces, walkways, and other elements should blend with the grid of north-south/east west oriented streets. It may vary somewhat where future development abuts more residentially oriented areas.

Two Visual Corridors are listed to protect and enhance in the University Services area. One that extend from the Pentacrest along South Capitol Street and the second along Burlington Street to the bridge and the Iowa River.

The purpose of the South of Burlington Street Study was to plan use of University property between Front Street and South Capital Street, extending south to the railroad tracks. The Study shows a 1500 car parking ramp, service building, chiller plant, and future academic building sites. As with all building sites, planning for new structures must address solutions for pedestrian links, CAMBUS access, short-term parking, and other issues outlined in the proposed Design Guidelines document and Pre-Schematic Design Plan Checklist.

Open spaces and pedestrian routes are delineated for the University Services area. Like the Old Capitol Functional Area most are on a grid system of pedestrian-oriented routes along urban streets with routes that connect to the river edge and major open space areas. An important link will be the open space and pedestrian connection from the north side of Burlington to the proposed development south of Burlington. As the South of Burlington Study facilities move from concept to construction, emphasis must be placed on incorporating open space and pedestrian-oriented links into plans and budgets.

East Residence Halls Functional Area
This area includes Stanley, Currier, Burge, and Daum Halls between North Clinton and the Cleary Walkway. The residential functional area is bordered on the south and west with academic buildings and on the east by Iowa City residential areas. The area has access to the academic buildings along the Cleary Walkway and has a direct connection to the Iowa River Hancher pedestrian bridge that leads to the music and theatre buildings. In earlier studies it was grouped with West Residence Halls into one functional area and while the two areas have campus residences, the East Campus urban grid environment is dramatically different from the West Campus curvilinear environment.

Four studies outlined later in this report are applicable to the East Residence Halls Functional Area. Three - Urban Forest Study, Bicycle Study, and Campus Lighting Strategy - focus on campus wide unity and continuity issues with applicability to this functional area. The Burge Hall - Preliminary Site Plan shows bike parking, seating areas, trees, special paving, ramps, bollards, service access, areas with movable tables w/chairs, and light poles.

Future development in the East Residence Halls Area should follow the urban character of the East Campus. Development of buildings, open spaces, walkways, and other elements should blend with the grid of north-south/east west oriented streets. Development of the Burge Hall plan from preliminary to final concepts should be sure to incorporate pedestrian corridors, drop-off parking, and other elements identified in this report.

Three major visual corridors pass through the East Residence Halls area. One is along the Cleary Walkway that extends south reaching to the Pentacrest and connecting north past North Hall and eventually to the Iowa River. The other two corridors are east-west oriented along Davenport and Bloomington Streets, extending through North Clinton Street to Dubuque Street and to the Iowa River. These significant Visual Corridors should be protected from view-blocking intrusions.

A Campus Entry site at the Church and Dubuque Streets intersection is near the East Residence Halls area and is a significant entrance point to the University. As noted in the Old Capitol Functional Area discussion, this site's proximity to the President's Residence makes it ideal for a campus entry feature. This functional area, however, has no space for additional structures.

Open spaces and pedestrian walks for the East Residence Halls Functional Area are on a grid system of pedestrian-oriented routes along urban streets that connect to the river edge and major open space areas. The T. Anne Cleary Walkway, which was only a proposal in the 1990 Campus Planning Framework, is now a reality. It functions as it was conceived in the 1990 report that said "the availability of this enhancement will greatly improve the quality of pedestrian circulation in the area and the residence halls' environment." With very limited vehicular access from Bloomington and Davenport Streets, this urban open space functions safely as a pedestrian-oriented system. Notes from Facilities Services Group - Administration indicate:

"The south block between Jefferson & Market Streets has been completed in the final design form. Between Market Street and North Hall and along Bloomington and Davenport Streets east to Clinton Street, the walkway is in an interim design stage until funds are available to complete the final design. Plans to extend the walkway north of North Hall are in a preliminary design phase with no time set for implementation."
The Cleary Walkway has does have vehicular conflicts at its intersections with Market Street and Jefferson Street. As noted in the Old Capitol area discussion above, these conflicts cannot be addressed by closing streets to traffic so other means - traffic signals, warning signs, pedestrian paving textures - should be reviewed.

Iowa Center for the Arts and the International Center Functional Area
This functional area is west of the Iowa River and extends from Park Road on the north to Iowa Avenue on the south and extends west across Riverside Drive along Park Road. The Iowa Center for the Arts contains Hancher Auditorium, Museum of Art, academic departments of Music, Theatre, Art and Art History, and the Alumni Center that formerly housed the University of Iowa Foundation and Alumni affairs. The Foundation and Alumni Association have moved to the new Levitt Center for University Advancement at the southeast corner of Riverside Drive and Park Road. The International Center is on a bluff above the Art Building and on the west side of Riverside Drive. The International Center fully occupies the top of a plateau, so any expansion is likely to be ruled out. The area west of Riverside Drive along Park Road contains Parklawn Residence Hall and Kuhl House/Iowa Press building. This functional area also includes the rock outcropping and Hutchinson Quarry at the base of the plateau below the International Center. As noted in the 1990 Plan, "the integrity of this area must be preserved."

Five studies outlined later in this report are applicable in this functional area. The River Corridor Study focuses on reclaiming the river as an important open space corridor. The Campus Lighting Strategy and Urban Forest Study address unity and continuity issues. The Bicycle Study promotes bicycles as an important mode of transportation. The key study for this area is the Landscape Master Plan for the Iowa Center for the Arts. This study focus on development of various shoreline, flood plane, building area, parking, and circulation issues in the Arts Campus area. The River Corridor Study that addressed the entire length of the river through campus is a follow-up to the Arts Campus Plan. The Master Plan establishes a compelling and appropriate character for the Arts Campus, creates a landscape character that reflects the quality of the Arts Campus academic programs, encourages collaborative endeavors among the arts disciplines, and address maintenance and ecological challenges of flooding and its impact on the character of the Arts Campus.

Future development in this functional area should follow the character of existing development. The 1990 plan notes "The Center is one of the few examples on campus of an extensive development that was carefully planned in advance and carried out according to the plan. As such, it contains no nonconforming uses with the exception of the privately owned parking lot in the northwest corner." The parking lot has since been acquired and new construction along Park Road has continued the careful planning and construction concept noted in 1990.

Visual Corridors in this area connect Riverside Drive and the Art Campus with the river. Corridors to preserve, protect and enhance from Riverside are along the north edge of Hancher, through the proposed Iowa River Garden & Greenway, between the Theatre Building and Alumni Center, and between the Museum of Art and the Art Building to the Iowa River.

Most Overlooks tend to be on elevated sites with distant views to areas below. The overlook in this area is at the corridor between the Alumni Center and Theatre Building. It overlooks the Iowa River from river bank height and provides a unique connecting view to this resource.

Two entrances to the campus are proposed for this functional area. The intersection of Riverside Drive and Park Road provides an ideal location for a campus entry point. A second entrance is along the boundary of this functional area and the Health Sciences/Hospital Functional Area. A proposed pedestrian bridge connecting the Health Sciences/Hospital and the International Center would span over Highway 6 and provide a valuable, safe pedestrian route between these two areas. The bridge would eliminate dangerous at-grade pedestrian attempts to cross the highway. The bridge also will be a prominent feature visible to everyone entering the University along Highway 6. The span across the highway is a prime opportunity to present a dramatic, quality University image to highway travelers and should not be a simple utilitarian bridge that skimps on design to save a few dollars. Its proximity to the Art Campus presents an opportunity to tie bridge design to public art using the many art resources available at the University.

There are two building sites in this functional area. One site is between the loop entry drive to Hancher auditorium and the river. This is a prominent site with high visibility from the Park Road bridge and the river. The second site is northeast of the International Center, west of Riverside Drive. Though not as prominent and visible as the Park Road site, this location will still have high visibility from Riverside Drive.

The proposed pedestrian bridge across Highway 6 is a valuable component of the open space and pedestrian system on the Arts campus. Preservation of existing natural features, access to other campus areas, and safe pedestrian walkways are all significant elements of a unified campus. Open spaces in this functional area contain a system of pedestrian-oriented routes that connect river edge pedestrian systems to other major open space areas. The proposed wetland area and other landscape improvements on the Art Campus add unique features and learning environments that also unify and strengthen this functional area. It is important also to preserve and protect the existing natural areas such as the wooded slopes and quarry area between the Iowa River and the International Center.

Health Sciences/Hospital Functional Area
The Health Sciences/Hospital Functional Area extends from Dental Science to Westlawn and from south of the VA Hospital to Melrose Avenue. It is the location of all on-campus, health-related teaching, research, and service activities. A major change is in process today as the Iowa Health Sciences/Hospital Campus Plan is implemented.

The Health Sciences/Hospital Campus Plan includes demolition of the existing Steindler building and construction of a Medical Education & Biomedical Research Facility. Other components of the plan include an addition to the Medical Education Building, a Westlawn addition, a parking ramp, realignment of Newton Road, a pedestrian bridge from the ramp area to the International Center over Highway 6, and an extensive network of pedestrian walks. Like all areas on the West Campus, the Urban Forest, Bicycle, and Lighting Studies have applicability to this functional area. Lighting, vegetation, signage, and other site elements should meet established University standards and guidelines for those elements.

The primary Visual Corridor within this functional area is from Dental Science to the Health Sciences/Hospital Campus. A strong visual connection between these two areas will help link them together. An Overlook site is proposed at the southeast corner of Westlawn above the Iowa River. This location has a distant view down to the river and could be developed as a distinct, dramatic, memorable, and formal stop along the campus open space system.

As described in the previous functional area, there is a potential major campus entry point along the boundary of Health Sciences/Hospital Functional Area. The proposed pedestrian bridge connecting the Health Campus and the International Center is a prime opportunity to express function, art, and quality to all who enter the University from Highway 6.

The proposed bridge is a key link in the campus pedestrian system. It safely connects two areas almost unreachable today by most pedestrians. It also makes a connection possible from Coralville through the University to northern Iowa City. This could be one of the key links in a regional trail system. The core pedestrian and open space areas near the structures within the Health Sciences/Hospital Campus also connect to a system of pedestrian-oriented routes within existing and proposed open spaces. Those links include connections to proposed overlooks on the bluffs above the river, to the wooded slopes between the river and the Nursing Building, and gathering sites east of proposed Medical Education Building and beneath the water tower south of the Speech & Hearing Center. The pedestrian and open space areas within this functional area represent the West Campus hub of the system.

West Residence Halls Functional Area
This functional area includes the Quadrangle, Rienow, Slater, and Hillcrest residence halls. As noted in the 1990 Framework, "with the exception of Slater Hall, which is separated from the other three facilities by Grand Avenue, the complex is relatively self contained." The Residence Services West Master Plan outlines potential development around the four residence halls. The Plan showed a new residence hall replacing the parking lot northwest of the Quadrangle. This building site also is shown on the Health Sciences Campus Master Plan as a potential medical building. The site could be suitable for either type of use but any building must be designed to be compatible with the residence halls, particularly in terms of vehicle access and traffic. The residence hall use should be given priority. Several pedestrian-oriented redevelopments of current vehicular spaces also are indicated. The major pedestrian change would involve closing Grand Avenue between Slater and Rienow to create a pedestrian mall. Like in other functional areas, the Urban Forest, Bicycle and Lighting studies address campus-wide unity and continuity issues with applicability to this functional area.

The 1990 Framework also discussed the potential "Melrose Diagonal" that since has been abandoned in favor of changing the Byington Road alignment. The revised alignment will be less disruptive to campus land uses and will place less of the campus outside the major road system.

Future development in the West Residence Halls Area is limited because there is not much available open space. The potential new residence hall that would replace the parking lot, however, is at least a possibility. Other improvements associated with the residence halls include enhancing entries of existing buildings and the possibility of using the existing tunnel between Rienow Hall and the Quadrangle as a service route for the Quadrangle food service.

There is an existing visual corridor along Grand Avenue from the Fieldhouse to the Iowa River. This view could be protected and enhanced with the addition of a few street trees and other plant material continuing the work already completed along this corridor. The great potential, however, appears to be in the pedestrian mall concept shown in the Residence Services West Campus Master Plan.

The hilltop near the northeast corner of Hillcrest provides a dramatic view down to the Iowa River and beyond to the Library, Old Capitol, and much of the East Campus. This ideal Overlook site is developable immediately and could be used by the current student population. The site might also be developed as a part of other circulation changes recommended by the Residence Services West Plan or as part of the proposed new residence hall. Whenever it is feasible, this site could be a memorable part of the campus open space system and increase quality and quantity of outdoor seating areas on campus.

No entry points are planned for this functional area. The building site in this area is at the existing parking lot north of Hillcrest and Quadrangle.

The parking lot bordering on the Quad Ravine is a visual and functional intrusion into this area. The 1990 Framework noted this parking as a non-conforming land use that "adds unnecessary traffic to the residence halls precinct and detracts from the environment of the ravine." It can be very difficult to "remove" parking spaces from an existing lot. However, reducing or eliminating this lot, with or without constructing a residence hall in its place, would be a major visual and environmental improvement to the West Campus. Removing the lot would allow reconstruction and renovation of the wooded slopes the lot removed when it was constructed and would reduce the need for the connecting streets and drives that serve it. Removing the lot also would meet the goals of the pedestrian-oriented campus concept. Importantly, though, other aspects of that concept also have to be met. Short-term parking and drop-off sites must be found. CAMBUS service from the parking areas designated as replacing the ones removed must be assured. Bicycle parking should be increased and enhanced and prioritized pedestrian friendly routes though the area should be established. Reduction of vehicular routes and conversion to pedestrian routes of areas within the areas defined by Quadrangle, Rienow Hall, Slater Hall, and Hillcrest also would enhance this functional area.

South Melrose Functional Area
This area includes the Boyd Law Building and extends south to Myrtle Avenue parking. It also includes several cultural centers, day care centers, the Hydraulics Lab along South Riverside Drive, and a wooded ravine with a walkway and bridge connecting Boyd to the Myrtle Street parking lot. It abuts the West Residence Halls area and includes residential type buildings along Grand Avenue Court. Some of the houses are used by university departments, including the Health Protection Office in two houses on the north and east side of the street. Some of the houses are used temporarily for faculty housing and three of the houses are privately owned.

Six studies are applicable to the South Melrose Functional Area. The Urban Forest Study, Iowa River Study, Bicycle Study, and Campus Lighting Strategy identify means of creating campus unity and continuity with applicability to this functional area. The Residence Services Master Plan abuts this functional area and the South Campus Entry Plan identifies revisions to parking and circulation along Riverside Drive and creation of a campus entry point at Myrtle and Riverside. It also shows parking areas, bicycle trail/walkway, and other elements along South Riverside Drive.

The character of any future development in this functional area should follow the existing development on the West Campus and maintain the architectural, site, orientation, traffic flow, parking, and other physical differences between the East and West Campus areas.

The area along the cliff on the west side of Riverside Drive is designated as a natural area to be protected. The cliffs are lighted at night to highlight them as a natural feature. The visual corridor to be protected in this functional area is the same as in the West Residence Hall area: along Grand Avenue from the Fieldhouse to the Iowa River. Grand Avenue is along part of the north boundary of the South Melrose area and as noted previously, this corridor should be protected and enhanced with the addition of a few street trees.

The university-owned houses along Melrose Court and the houses along Melrose occupied by a day care operation are considered temporary uses.

Because much of this functional area is on the bluff above Riverside Drive and the Iowa River, it has great potential for development of an Overlook site. Southeast of Boyd there is a potential site where distant views of Iowa City and nearby views of the East Campus and Iowa River could be dramatically framed.

The South Campus Entry Master Plan identifies the intersection of Myrtle and Riverside Drive as a potential location for a dramatic entry feature to the University. The entry feature might be connected to a Visitors Information Center with parking, information kiosk, telephone, lighting, and connection to a bicycle trail walkway along the river also shown in the plan.

Above the Myrtle Avenue and South Riverside Drive intersection and east of the Myrtle Street parking area there is a potential building site. The Myrtle Street parking lot is a potential building site as well. As with all building sites, new structures should include solutions for pedestrian links, CAMBUS access, short-term parking, and other issues outlined in the proposed Design Guidelines document and Pre-Schematic Design Plan Checklist.

The area between Boyd and Myrtle Street is one of the remaining wooded ravines on campus. It is a visual and environmental asset and should be protected, particularly as plans develop for any new facilities at proposed building sites. Pedestrian connections to the proposed Overlook are also proposed. Part of the pedestrian system should include a river edge pedestrian route that includes future connections between Burlington Avenue and the intersection of Myrtle Avenue and South Riverside Drive and routes that connect from the open space and river edge systems to other major open space areas.

Sports Functional Area
This functional area includes Carver Hawkeye Basketball Arena, Baseball Stadium, Kinnick Football Stadium, open spaces and parking lots near the Recreation Building, and the Fieldhouse. The 1990 Framework Plan showed the west extent of the Functional Area aligned through the parking area west of Carver Hawkeye and angling southwest between the Field Hockey field and the Substation Control Building. The functional area has been expanded to include the twenty acre wooded slope west of Carver Hawkeye, the lower Finkbine athletic fields, and Finkbine Golf Course.

The Urban Forest, Lighting, and Bicycle studies have application in the Sports area just as they do in other areas. They provide means of linking this sometimes distant area to the East Campus and center of the West Campus areas. The Athletic Facilities Long Range Plan shows both the Sports area and other campus sites and identifies recreation fields to remain south of Hawkins Drive, south of the Memorial Union, and within the Lower Finkbine area.

Development in the Sports area should follow the character of existing development. Lighting, vegetation, signage, and other site elements should meet established University standards and guidelines for those elements. There are two View Corridors that begin in this functional area. One begins at the Fieldhouse and extends to the Iowa River along Grand Avenue through the West Residence and South Melrose functional areas. The second extends from Carver-Hawkeye through Dental Science and on through to the Health Sciences/Hospital Campus as part of that functional area.

There are no proposed Overlooks in this area but there are two Campus Entry sites and one proposed structure. One is at the intersection of US Highway 6 and Hawkins Drive west of the twenty acre wooded hilltop. This is a well-used entry point to the West Campus and provides an opportunity to present a welcoming University image at this major intersection. The second site adjoins the intersection of Melrose Avenue and the C.R.I. & P. Railroad. This location provides access from the adjoining neighborhood to the West Campus and has direct links to hospital parking ramps.

The Sports Functional Area offers a number of Open Space and Pedestrian opportunities. As part of an overall improvement to pedestrian circulation there is a potential gathering site south of Carver Hawkeye Arena and a pedestrian connection to Ronald McDonald House and the adjoining 20 acre wooded hilltop. Improved pedestrian connection to the Finkbine commuter parking lot, pedestrian connections to Lower Finkbine Athletic Fields and west to Hawkeye Drive Apartments in the Far West Campus, and improved access to the Prairie/Woodland/Wetland area west of Hawkins Drive in the lower Finkbine area are all part of the Sports area plan.

A notable potential is the rerouting of Hawkins Drive to a more southerly edge of campus route and redefining the former alignment area to a pedestrian-oriented open space. It could enhance vehicle movement, consolidate open space, add continuity to the pedestrian system, and create potential building sites. As noted earlier, it is an opportunity that merits further research to maximize the potential benefits and address the many concerns that naturally arise with the potential of change. Stakeholders in the potential rerouting should help define the issues involved and resolution of those issues before the concept is incorporated into the plan.

Far West Functional Area
This is the campus area west of Mormon Trek Boulevard bounded by the Iowa Interstate Railroad tracks, Melrose Avenue, and the West Campus boundary. It includes Hawkeye Court Apartments, Hawkeye Drive Apartments, Clear Creek and its woodland, the Mormon Handcart site, and substantial acres of open areas.

The Forest and Lighting Studies did not extend to this area but the Bicycle Study did include portions of the Far West Campus. The University of Iowa Athletic Facilities Long Range Master Plan and the University of Iowa Sports & Recreation Facilities Long Range Master Plan Amendment address circulation, future golf course, recreation fields, Conference Center and golf clubhouse, and preservation of Hawkeye Court and Hawkeye Drive Apartments. The plans also address proposed flag football fields, tennis courts, tennis building, a women's soccer stadium, natatorium, and parking.

There are no Visual Corridors, Overlooks, or Campus Entry Site delineated for the Far West Campus Functional Area. Building sites are those shown in the University of Iowa Athletic Facilities Long Range Plan and Amendment. Open Space and Pedestrian systems need to be addressed in this area. The pedestrian-oriented campus concept does not stop at the boundaries of the West Campus. The concept is as important here as on the Main Campus. Connections between the Far West and Main Campus areas should be strengthened to ensure this area is perceived as part of the campus.

The woodland area adjoining Clear Creek is an environmental classroom and natural area opportunity. The woods along the creek contain environmentally fragile areas that must be protected. The entire woodlands are to be protected and preserved as a natural area. Preliminary archaeological investigation has indicated there may be valuable sites in the area south of the Mormon Handcart site and west of the recreation fields.

Oakdale Campus Functional Area
This includes all 500+ acres of the Oakdale Campus but concentrates on the 250 acre Research Campus area south of Oakdale Boulevard and east of Highway 965. The Oakdale Research Park is a quasi-University entity under the jurisdiction of the Oakdale Research Park Board and is not included in this Framework Plan.

The University of Iowa Oakdale Campus Master Plan establishes the development scenario for the research campus portion of this functional area. Concepts within the Bicycle, Lighting, and Forestry Studies should be applied here, perhaps through a formal evaluation of how the current Master Plan addresses those concepts. Future development should follow the character of existing development on the Oakdale Campus as shown in the Master Plan.

There are no Visual Corridors or Overlooks specifically recommended in the Master Plan but some could be interpreted. A main entry at Highway 965 and Oakdale Boulevard and three secondary entrances at 965 and Crosspark Road, Oakdale gravel road on the east and Crosspark Road at the southern boundary documented in the plan. The Open Space system also is shown within the Master Plan.

East, West & Far West Campus Development
Recognize, maintain, enhance, and continue the differences between the East, West, and Far West Campus areas of The University of Iowa.

There are physical differences between the East, West, and Far West Campus areas. The Main Campus is divided by the Iowa River and differences between the East and West Campus areas are reflected in architecture, site, orientation, traffic flow, parking, and other elements. The Far West Campus is unique as well.

The East Campus is an urban environment with a grid of north-south/east-west oriented streets and buildings, tied to downtown Iowa City, with few open green spaces beyond the Pentacrest. It is separated/connected to the West Campus by the Iowa River. Future development on the East Campus should follow the same existing urban character:

The West Campus is less urban, is within a loop road system with buildings aligned with the loop. It adjoins residential and medical neighbors, has large open green spaces at the west edge away from the residence hall area, smaller leftover greenspaces between buildings, and is separated/connected to the East Campus by the Iowa River. Future development on the West Campus should follow a similar character to existing development:
  • Buildings set back from or close to the right-of-way.
  • Buildings occupy a portion or most of the site.
  • Parking adjoins the site or is on-site in a parking structure.
  • A pedestrian-oriented, ground-level, space is part of the site.
  • Building and ground-level pedestrian space connected to the overall pedestrian system.
  • Buildings have a similar height and scale as the surrounding structures.
  • Lighting, vegetation, signage, and other site elements meet established University standards and guidelines for those elements.
The Far West Campus is closer to the West Campus in character but has fewer constructed elements within it. Much of the Far West Campus is open with wooded areas along Clear Creek. It is separated/connected to the West Campus by Finkbine Golf Course. Future development on the Far West Campus should follow a similar character to existing development and be compatible with Hawkeye Court and Hawkeye Drive Apartments:
  • Buildings set back from the right-of-way.
  • Buildings occupy a portion of an individual site.
  • Parking is on-site in a surface parking lot.
  • A pedestrian-oriented, ground-level, space is part of the site.
  • Building and ground-level pedestrian space connected to the overall pedestrian system.
  • Buildings are compatible with nearby residential services housing.
  • Lighting, vegetation, signage, and other site elements meet established University standards and guidelines for those elements.
  • Urban Forest, Lighting, and other campus-wide studies should be updated to include Far West Campus areas.
  • Buffer existing residential areas from intrusion from new development.
  • Protect Clear Creek, wooded areas, the Mormon Handcart site, wetlands, and other sensitive areas.
  • Development should not occur west of Hawkeye Road until a Master Plan for that area is established and development east of the road is completed.

Last Updated: Thursday, January 28, 1999
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