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In the Matter of Equal Employment Opportunity Inquiry

 

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

 

36 F.C.C.2d 515

 

RELEASE-NUMBER: FCC 72-701

 

JULY 28, 1972 

 


JUDGES:

          THE COMMISSION BY COMMISSIONERS ROBERT E. LEE (ACTING CHAIRMAN), H. REX LEE, REID, WILEY AND HOOKS WITH COMMISSIONER JOHNSON CONCURRING IN PART AND DISSENTING IN PART ISSUED THE FOLLOWING PUBLIC NOTICE


OPINION:

 [*515]  EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY INQUIRY

In processing Pennsylvania and Delaware license renewal applications the Commission examined each licensee's Equal Employment Opportunity Program (Section VI of FCC Form 303) in conjunction with its 1971 and 1972 Annual Employment Reports (FCC Form 395).

Based on this examination, the Commission is sending letters to 30 stations requesting additional information on the licensees' efforts to provide equal employment opportunity to minority persons and women.  In sum, the Commission requested each licensee to explain why they believe that their employment record, as revealed in their 1971 and 1972 Annual Employment Reports, in consistent with the Commission's equal employment opportunity rules (Sections 73.125, 73.301 and 73.680).

As the Commission stated in its 1970 Report and Order, 23 FCC 2d 430, concerning nondiscrimination in broadcast employment practices, statistical data for any given year may not necessarily demonstrate the existence of discriminatory employment practices at a particular station.  The Commission also stated, however, that statistical data can be useful to show industry employment patterns and to raise appropriate questions as to the reasons for such patterns.

Action on the renewal applications of those stations questioned will be deferred pending completion of the Commission's inquiry.  After receipt of the information requested from those stations queried, the Commission will be in a better position to evaluate the effectiveness of their equal employment opportunity programs.  Also, the Commission may be better informed of the problems broadcasters are encountering in implementing their programs.  Based on the experience gained, the Commission will be in a position to determine whether further action is necessary to effectuate equal employment opportunity for minority persons and women in the broadcast industry.

In the meantime, the Commission wishes to emphasize that all broadcast licensees are expected to make positive efforts to implement both the spirit and letter of this important national policy -- namely, that of providing equal employment opportunity without regard to race, color, religion, national origin or sex.

 [*516]  Action by the Commission July 26, 1972.  Commissioners Robert E. Lee (Acting Chairman), H. Rex Lee, Reid, Wiley and Hooks, with Commissioner Johnson concurring in part and dissenting in part for the reasons to be shown in statement on Delaware and Pennsylvania renewals.


CONCURBY: JOHNSON (IN PART)

 

DISSENTBY: JOHNSON (IN PART)

 

DISSENT:

 [*517]  OPINION OF COMMISSIONER NICHOLAS JOHNSON, CONCURRING IN PART AND DISSENTING IN PART

Some four years after the Civil Rights Act of 1964 the FCC promulgated equal employment opportunity regulations for broadcasters.  Nondiscrimination Employment Practices of Broadcast Licensees, 13 F.C.C. 2d 766 (1968); Nondiscrimination Employment Practices of Broadcast Licensees, 13 F.C.C. 2d 240 (1969); Nondiscrimination Employment Practices of Broadcast Licensees, 23 F.C.C. 2d 430 (1970).

As a part of those regulations, a new reporting form ("Form 395") was required to be filed annually.  18 F.C.C. 2d 240 (1969); 23 F.C.C. 2d 430 (1970). The form indicates the number of women, blacks and other minorities employed by the station in various job categories.

We have now been receiving these forms for over one year, and are thus able to examine changes in employment practices for the first time.  The stations involved are now before us for license renewal -- all radio and television stations in Pennsylvania and Delaware.

At the present time the Commission has neither personnel nor procedures for analyzing and processing these employment reports.  We may, ultimately, want to establish a full staffed independent office at the FCC for this and related purposes.  Meanwhile, the forms are before us, and must either be ignored or acted upon in some fashion.

Confronted with these choices the Broadcast Bureau, my personal staff, and I have endeavored to evolve some standards that might be useful in processing these forms.  n1 All Commissioners agree that no station should have its license revoked because of a statistical analysis of its employment record.  All agree that some stations should at least get a letter from the FCC asking for an explanation of their employment patterns.  The problem, then, is one of degree.  What criteria should be used?  How many stations should be queried?  Should a stronger sanction (say, a one-year probationary renewal) be used in the worst cases?  As might be expected, the Commissioners disagree on these questions. 

n1 My special thanks to Bob Thorpe.  Ivan Webber, and Sue Milson for their analytical conceptions and hours of dedicated computation, and to Bonnie Herbert for painstaking typing of the charts used in our Commission presentations and this opinion.

At the outset, let me repeat that no Commissioner has urged a "quota" system, nor final Commission action based upon mere statistics alone.  No sanctions are proposed for any station without first giving that station an opportunity to be heard on the reasons for its employment patterns, reasons which may be quite persuasive as to its good faith efforts to comply with the Commission's regulations.  (Nor, I should note, do statistics clear a station of charges -- and proof -- that it has followed discriminatory practices in employment.) The only question is the criteria to be used by the Commission (when it is not confronted with complaints) in deciding to inquire further into the employment practices of some stations and not others.

I will describe some of these alternative criteria generally before detailing the analyses used.

The general standard, I presume, in any evaluation of fair employment practices based on statistics alone, is a rough parity between the  [*518]  number of potential employees available and those actually hired in an positions.

For example, blacks constitute 11% of the population nationally.  If one assumes that there is a national labor pool in broadcasting, the 11% figure might be used.  If one assumes the local labor pool is the relevant population, those figures are either higher (Philadelphia is 17% black) or lower (Pittsburgh is 7% black).  One could say that any station employing less than that percentage (whichever is decided to be applicable) should get a letter.  Or, one could set one-half of that amount as the cutoff.  (That is, in a community that is 10% black, all stations employing less than 5% blacks would get letters.)

Determining the relevant percentages for women is somewhat more difficult.  Is the relevant percentage 50%, or the percentage of women in the work force (say, 30 to 40%)?

Both blacks and women suffer doubly.  In part, it is a matter of the total numbers employed.  But it is also a matter of the number of blacks and women in high paying jobs.  It is here where discrimination is felt most harshly.  Janitorial and secretarial positions are not the ultimate in employment opportunity.

The appropriate comparison here, it would seem to me, is the percentage of the minority in question in high paying jobs compared to the percentage of all employees in high paying jobs.  For example, if five of ten blacks are in high paying jobs, and twenty of forty of all employees are in high paying jobs, there is a 1.00 relationship between the percentages (50% of blacks; 50% of all employees).  If, on the other hand, only two blacks are in high paying jobs, there is a 0.40 relationship (20% of blacks; 50% of all employees).  That is, less than half as many blacks are in high paying jobs (40%) as there are of all employees in high paying jobs.  The same approach can be used for computing the relationship between the percentages of women in high paying jobs and all employees in high paying jobs.

The standard for sending letters with regard to minority high pay employment could be anything below a 1.00 relationship, or it could be some lesser cutoff: 0.75 or 0.50.

The Commission has chosen to ignore these criteria, and consider only those stations with no blacks or women, or whose employment of blacks and women has actually declined.  Even in these relatively few cases, the suggestion is clear that the station may be able to excuse its record if it has not hired any employees during the past year.  In light of the fact that all we are doing is sending letters, and that we are now trying to gather more information about how the program is working, I believe these criteria are far too restrictive.

Furthermore, the Commission is only looking at stations with more than ten employees.  Admittedly, it's a little difficult to have 10% of five employees.  But we have deliberately required reports of all stations with five or more employees, and I believe those reports should be examined and subject to the application of some criteria -- at least in the most extreme cases.  (For example, there is a station (WFAE), in a city that is 30% black (Farrell, Pennsylvania), which employs no blacks in its six-man work force.  I would send station WFAR a letter.)

 [*519]  Although I would have queried many more stations, I applaud the Commission's interest and I believe a beginning has been made.  Our new Commissioner, Judge Hooks, has done an excellent job of pushing the Commission about as far as it could be pushed -- clearly more than I could have achieved -- and that has been a real accomplishment.  The industry is now again on notice that the Commission intends to monitor performance, to expect improvement, and to act when the evidence indicates a need.  The Commission has promised to take similar action in the next renewal group.  I concur in what the majority has done.

I would have sent letters to every station with 10 or more employees in communities where there are more than 1% blacks, and (1) the station's black employment is less than the percent of blacks in the community, or (2) the station has a lower proportion of blacks in high paying jobs than the proportion of all employees in high paying jobs.  In addition, I would have sent a letter to (3) every station with ten or more employees that has no black employees.  I would defer renewal until adequate explanations were received from the stations.  I would be prepared to consider short-term renewals (requiring only a new equal-employment showing in a year) for stations in the bottom 20% of these criteria.  I would have sent letters to (4) stations with ten or more employees whose percentage of women in high paying jobs is less than 0.5 of the percentage of all employees that are in high paying jobs.  And I would write letters to (5) stations with ten or more employees which have no women employees or (6) whose percentage of women employees has declined below the percentage of women in the work force in the city of license (or SMSA).  And I would be willing to consider short-term renewals for stations that show up in the bottom 20% of these criteria, too.

In addition, there are certain stations with fewer than ten employees to which I would have sent letters on the basis of their exceptionally poor showing statistically.  Among these are the radio station in Mexico, Pennsylvania, WJUN, which has no women employed; the radio station in Farrell, Pennsylvania, WFAR, which employs no blacks in a community that is 30% black: and the radio station in Seaford, Delaware, WSUX, which is in a community 18% black, and yet employs no blacks.  In my view these appear to be gross imbalances in the make-up of the licensee's employment that -- on the statistical facts alone -- cannot be forgiven because these stations happen to have less than ten employees.

Moreover, the use of the criteria I have itemized selectively identifies those stations that reasonably could be asked to explain why their performances seems inconsistent with compliance with Commission equal employment rules.  I believe these criteria do so better than the criteria used by the majority.  I believe that to be true whatever number of stations are selected by the Commission to receive letters.

Now let us turn to a little more detailed explanation of the analyses and charts.  The analyses were done based on data available as of a certain date, focusing on the employment of blacks and women (other minorities are very small in these states).  More data became available later.  Some stations filed late, or for other reasons had not made data available earlier.  Rather than trying to redo the analysis completely, in view of our very limited staff resources this late data was ignored.   [*520]  It would have made very little difference in the patterns of performance anyway.  Radio and television were treated separately.

In the belief that persons outside the Commission would find the information useful, I present here our analysis of the employment of blacks and women in Pennsylvania and Delaware.  There are numerous ways of manipulating the data, and developing criteria for Commission action.  Hopefully, one result of the Commission's efforts will be improvements in these areas.  I specifically solicit comments from interested parties on alternative analysis and procedures.

Television -- Black Employment

Pennsylvania's population is 8.61% black, Delaware's population is 14.3% black.  Of 27 stations where data is complete, the comparative statistics on overall black employment are shown by Table I.

TABLE I. -- Percentage of black employees

1971 total employment

2,179

1971 black employment

146

Percent black employment

6.7

1972 total employment

2,140

1972 black employment

157

Percent black employment

7.3

The comparative statistics on employment in the three highest ranked job categories in FCC Form 395 (for which 24 stations forms are complete) are shown by Table II.

TABLE II. -- Percentage of highly paid black employees

1971 HP employment

1,191

1971 black HP

45

Percent black HP

3.8

1972 total HP employment

1,171

1972 black HP

50

Percent black HP

4.3

Of perhaps greater relevance is the ratio of blacks in high paid jobs to the ratio of all employees in high paid jobs.  There are approximately one-half as many blacks in such positions.

TABLE III. -- Ratio of blacks to all employees in highly paid jobs

1971 ratio:

Black HP Black / All HP All employment; 0.564

1972 ratio:

Black HP Black / All HP All employment; 0.582

Moreover, of the 27 stations reporting there are 10, with a total employment of 323, that employed no blacks in either 1971 or 1972.  n2 Of the 26 stations for which relevant data are available, there are 13 -- one-half -- with a 1972 total of 324 high paid employees that had no blacks in high paid jobs in 1971 or 1972.  n3

n2 WFBG-TV, Altoona: WLYH-TV, Lebanon; WSBA-TV, York; WDAU-TV, Scranton; WNER-TV, Wilkes-Barre; WSEE-TV, Erie; WJET-TV, Erie; WQLN-TV, Erie; WPSX-TV, Clearfield; and WLVT-TV, Allentown.

n3 WKBX-TV, Philadelphia; WFBG-TV, Altoona; WLYH-TV, Lebanon; WSBA-TV, York; WBRE-TV, Wilkes-Barre; WNEP-TV, Wilkes-Barre; WDAU-TV, Scranton; WICU-TV, Erie; WSEE-TV, Erie; WJET-TV, Erie; WQLN-TV, Erie; WPSX-TV, Clearfield; and WLVT-TV, Allentown.

 [*521]  Women Employment

Pennsylvania's population is 51.96% women, Delaware's population is 51.23% women.  For the 27 stations where data is complete, the comparative statistics for overall employment of women are shown by Table IV.

TABLE IV. -- Percentage of women employees

1971 total employment

2,179

1971 women employment

484

Percent women

22.2

1972 total employment

2,140

1972 women employment

472

Percent women

22.1

For the 24 stations from which relevant data is complete, the comparative statistics for high pay employment of women is shown by Table V.

TABLE V. -- Percentage of highly paid women employees

1971 Total HP employment

1,191

1971 HP women

84

Percent HP women

7.1

1972 Total HP employment

1,171

1972 HP women

63

Percent HP women

5.4

Once again, of greatest relevance is the ratio of women in highly paid jobs to all employees in highly paid jobs.  There are about one-quarter as many women in such jobs as all employees -- a ratio about one-half of that for blacks -- and one that has significantly declined from 1971 to 1972.

TABLE VI. -- Ratio of women to all employees in highly paid jobs

1971 ratio:

Women HP Women / All HP All employment; 0.318

1972 ratio:

Women HP Women / All HP All employment; 0.244

Of 24 stations reporting relevant data, there are five with a total 1972 high pay employment of 147 that have no women in high pay jobs in 1971 or 1972.  n4

n4 WKBS-TV, Philadelphia; WFBG-TV, Altoona; WDAU-TV, Scranton; WICU-TV, Erie; and WSEE-TV, Erie.

Our analysis also includes seven charts which provide data on individual stations.  Chart I shows the number and percent of black employment (1971 and 1972) by markets and stations.  Chart II shows number and percent of black high pay employment (1971 and 1972) by markets and stations.  Chart III shows an index for stations in SMSAs with more than one percent blacks.  This index relates the percent of black employment (or black HP employment) to the percent of blacks in the SMSA.  The chart also compares the percent of blacks in HP jobs to the percent of all employees in HP jobs for each station.

Chart IV shows number and percent of overall employment of women in 1971 and 1972 by market and station.  Chart V shows number and percent of employment of women in high pay jobs 1971 and 1972.  The chart also compares the percent of women in HP jobs to the percent of all employees in HP jobs.

As I have done in other analysis of stations, n5 Chart VI shows the  [*522]  rank of stations in seven categories of black employment measures.  Chart VII makes the same ranking for women.  n6

n5 See, e.g., New York State License Renewals, 18 F.C.C. 2d 268, 269, 322 (1969); Renewals of Standard Broadcast and Television Licensee, 21 F.C.C. 2d 35 (1969).

n6 There are only five categories.  Computing an index would not affect the ranks.  The variation in percent of women in different cities is so small that any index figure would produce exactly the same rank as that of percent of women employed.  Figures on the percent of the work force who vary less markedly than the percentages of blacks in the population.

Radio -- Black Employment

Pennsylvania's population is 8.61% black Delaware's population is 14.3% black.  Of the 138 stations for which data are available for 1971, and of the 150 stations for which 1972 data are available, the comparative statistics on overall black employment are shown by Table I.

TABLE I. -- Percent of black employees

1971 total employment

2,282

1971 black employment

102

Percent black employment

4.47

1972 total employment

2,477

1972 black employment

119

Percent black employment

4.80

The comparative statistics on employment in the highest three job categories in FCC Form 395 are shown by Table II.

TABLE II. -- Percent of highly paid black employees

1971 HP employment

1,302

1972 black HP

38

Percent black HP

2.92

1972 HP employment

1,528

1972 black HP

62

Percent black HP

4.06

The ratio of blacks in high paid jobs to all employees in high paid jobs is shown by Table III.

TABLE III. -- Ratio of blacks to all employees in highly paid jobs

1971 ratio:

Black HP Black / All HP All employment; 0.653

1972 ratio:

Black HP Black / All HP All employment; 0.844

Of the 138 stations, there are 112, with a total employment of 1,439 that have no blacks in either 1971 or 1972.  And there are 136 stations with a 1972 high pay job total of 1,077 that have no blacks in high pay jobs.

Women Employment

For the stations for which data is available, the comparative statistics for overall employment of women by radio stations are shown by Table IV.

TABLE IV. -- Percentage of women employees

1971 total employment

2,282

1971 women employment

504

Percent women employment

22.09

1972 total employment

2,477

1972 women employment

541

Percent women employment

21.84

The comparative statistics for high pay employment of women are shown by Table V.

TABLE V. -- Percentage of highly paid women employees

1971 HP employment

1,302

1971 HP women

56

Percent HP women

4.30

1972 HP employment

1,528

1972 HP women

71

Percent HP women

4.65

 [*523]  Of greatest significance for women is the ratio of women to all employees in highly paid jobs.  A woman fills such a job only about one-fifth as often as all other employees -- a figure about one-quarter that of blacks.

TABLE VI. -- Ratio of women to all employees in highly paid jobs

1971 ratio:

Women HP Women / All HP All employment; 0.194

1972 ratio:

Women HP Women / All HP All employment; 0.212

Of 138 stations there are 88 stations with 818 high pay jobs that have no women in high paying jobs in 1972.

The Selected Data Radio Charts

For each Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA), and for the non-SMSAs, there are two "Selected Data Charts." Chart I gives 1971 and 1972 data on the percent and number of black employees.  This chart also gives high pay comparisons and community indexes on the employment of blacks.  The high pay comparison shows the correlation between the percentage of minority employees holding high paid jobs and all employees holding high paid jobs (e.g., in a station with 50% of its minority employees in high paying jobs the comparison would be numerically represented as 1.00; if only 25% of the minority employees held high paying jobs the comparison would be.50; and if 100% of the station's minority employees held high paying jobs the comparison would be 2.00).  The community index is a numerical representation of the correlation between the percent of blacks employed by a station and the percent of blacks in the community with the number 100 representing a perfect correlation.  (E.g., in an area 10% black, a station with 20% of its employees black would have an index of 200, a station 10% black an index of 100, and a station 5% black an index of 50.)

Chart II does the same thing for the employment of women except the community index is deleted.  Both charts are arranged according to total 1972 employment with largest stations at the top and smallest at the bottom.

Conclusion

An initial evaluation of the first batch statistics on employment of women and blacks by radio and television stations (those from Pennsylvania and Delaware) suggests the broadcasting industry has a long way to go to achieve the standards of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the FCC's employment regulations of 1968-70.

No one urges, especially in these early stages, punitive action for its own sake, or the rigid application of statistical analyses alone.  It is results that we are after -- a rapid and intense effort to make up for hundreds of years of discrimination, not merely the absence of continued prejudice.  It may very well be that FCC (or joint government-industry) counseling, recruiting and training programs will be necessary in the near future.

 [*524]  At the same time the FCC -- as well as the broadcasting industry -- must get on with the job, now, with what it has.

The majority has begun -- even though much more modestly than I would have.  If the hours my staff has put into these reports has been, and will continue to do, of some help in directing and spurring these early commission efforts we will be well repaid.


DISSENTING OPINION OF COMMISSIONER NICHOLAS JOHNSON

Once again the Commission delegates to its staff the renewal, as if by rote, of the licenses of a number of stations in Pennsylvania and Delaware that fail to meet even minimal standards in the areas of news, public affairs, or other non-entertainment programming.

Once again I dissent.

It is a well-known, if unfortunate, fact that this Commission has never been able to agree upon a set of minimal public interest programming standards for broadcast licensees.  Even though I feel it is impossible to "quantify" the public starvation in the area of responsible public-interest programming, some standards, any standards, would be refreshing and welcome.  Entering the vacuum the rest of the Commission had refused to fill, former Commissioner Kenneth Cox and I proposed the 5-1-5 standard that is now universally accepted as the "subsistence" level beneath which no station's audience should be required to suffer.  Licensees, under this standard, would be required to program at least 5% news, 1% public affairs and 5% other non-entertainment programming.  14 F.C.C. 2d 1 (1968). Since the vast majority of licensees propose to devote 30% or more of their airtime to commercials, it can be seen that this standard is minuscule indeed.  Even absent a petition to deny or a competing application, no station should be renewed unless such standards could be met.  Yet this renewal package finds another two dozen stations falling below these levels in one or more of the areas of concern.

Fortunately for the ultimate survival of the regulatory process, the public is also concerned about that little thing called "public interest," and it is no coincidence that some 16 of these very stations are on a deferred renewal status, most facing petitions to deny.  Nevertheless, the following eight stations have been granted renewals today, and as to them I dissent:

Proposals of less than five percent news

 

 

Previously

Actually

Now

 

proposed

carried

proposed

 

Percent

Percent

Percent

WTPA-TV, Harrisburg, Pa

5.0

4.5

4.5

 [*550]  Proposals of less than one percent public affairs

(There are three stations in this category, and all are on deferred status.)

Proposals of less than five percent other

WGBI

Scranton, Pa.

WKVA

Lewistown, Pa.

WQTW

Latrobe, Pa.

WRAW

Reading, Pa.

WRSC

State College, Pa.

WJET-TV

Erie, Pa.

WTPA-TV

Harrisburg/York/Lebanon,

 

Pa.

In addition to minimal proposed standards of public interest programming, the Commission seems also to ave abandoned its inquiry into licensees' "promise vs. performance" for purpose of evaluating unopposed applications for renewal.  For although no stations are noted in the renewal package as having actually performed at a lower level of public service than originally promised, the data in the record indicates the failure of a number of stations to live up to even their own meager promises in areas of importance to the public.  See, for example, the news programming of station WTPA-TV, Harrisburg, Pa., noted above.  In some cases, indeed, the station seems to have performed at a considerably lower level than promised, as with station WTAF-TV, Philadelphia, Pa., which promised 8.5% news, but delivered only 4.8%, and now proposes a mere 1.8%.  WTAF is currently deferred under a petition to deny, but how many others were granted with similar deficits?

The Commission's performance -- despicable enough in the past -- has been getting worse.  If the Commission won't do the job public and broadcasters alike have no option but to suffer even more of the burden of license renewal challengers.


APPENDIX:

TV STATIONS -- PENNSYLVANIA

CHART I. -- Percentage of black employees

 

1971 employees

 

 

1972

employees

Station

Black

Percent

 

 

 

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

316

37

11.7

282

KYW

197

14

7.1

202

WPVI

193

18

9.3

153

WPHL u

76

11

14.5

75

WTAF u

63

3

4.8

66

WKBS u

61

7

11.5

65

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

160

14

8.8

178

WQUED/WQEX e

153

12

7.8

155

WICC

141

12

8.5

144

WTAE

132

8

6.1

130

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

74

2

2.7

74

WFBG

60

0

0

59

WARD u

9

0

0

NA

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/

 

Lebanon:

 

WGAL

124

3

2.4

123

WTPA u

40

2

5.0

40

WHP u

37

1

2.7

38

WLYH u

27

0

0

33

WSBA u

20

0

0

18

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton:

 

WBRE u

48

1

2.1

48

WNEP u

45

0

0

44

WDAU u

36

0

0

34

Erie:

 

WICU

41

1

2.4

44

WSEE u

28

0

0

25

WJET u

24

0

0

24

WQLN u

18

0

0

16

Clearfield:

 

WPSX e

45

0

0

53

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

17

0

0

17

Scranton:

 

WVIA e

18

0

0

NA

Harrisburg:

 

WITF e

69

1

1.4

NA

Wilmington, Del./Philadelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

NA

NA

NA

82

 

 

 

Percent

 

Station

Black

Percent

black in

 

 

 

 

SMSA

 

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

35

12.4

17.32

 

KYW

20

9.9

 

WPVI

20

13.1

 

WPHL u

6

8.0

 

WTAF u

5

7.9

 

WKBS u

9

13.8

 

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

19

10.7

7.07

 

WQED/WQEX e

11

7.1

 

WICC

12

8.3

 

WTAE

9

6.9

 

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

1

1.4

1.350/0.72

 

WFBG

0

0

 

WARD u

NA

NA

 

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/

 

Lebanon:

 

WGAL

3

2.4

1.67/5.43/

 

 

 

 

6.84/0.48

 

WTPA u

3

7.5

 

WHP u

1

2.6

 

WLYH u

0

0

 

WSBA u

0

0

 

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton:

 

WBRE u

2

4.2

0.48/0.40

 

WNEP u

0

0

 

WDAU u

0

0

 

Erie:

 

WICU

1

2.3

3.39

 

WSEE u

0

0

 

WJET u

0

0

 

WQLN u

0

0

 

Clearfield/

 

WPSX e

0

0

.77

 

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

0

0

1.18

 

Scranton:

 

WVIA e

NA

NA

.40

 

Harrisburg:

 

WITF e

NA

NA

6.84

 

Wilmington, Del./Philadelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

6

7.3

12.19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 stNOTES:

u=UHF.

e=Educational station.

NA=Not available.

CHART II. -- Black high pay employment

 

1971 em-

Total

Black

Percent

Station

ployees

HP

HP

black

 

 

 

 

of HP

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

316

205

9

4.4

KYW

197

112

4

3.6

WPVI

193

104

10

9.6

WPHL u

76

38

3

7.9

WTAF u

63

42

1

2.4

WKBS u

61

37

0

0

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

160

100

4

4.0

WQED/WQEX e

153

NA

NA

NA

WIIC

141

100

7

7.0

WTAE

132

76

4

5.3

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

74

51

1

2.0

WFBC

60

34

0

0

WARD u

9

5

0

0

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/

 

Lebanon:

 

WGAL

124

NA

NA

NA

WTPA u

40

25

1

4.0

WHP u

37

24

1

4.0

WLYH u

27

16

0

0

WSBA u

20

13

0

0

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton:

 

WBRE u

48

28

0

0

WNEP u

45

30

0

0

WDAU u

36

26

0

0

Erie:

 

WICU

41

29

0

0

WSEE u

28

17

0

0

WJET u

24

17

0

0

WQLN e

18

15

0

0

Clearfield:

 

WPSX e

45

38

0

0

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

17

14

0

0

Scranton:

 

WVIA e

18

14

0

0

Harrisburg:

 

WITF e

69

41

1

2.4

Wilmington, Del./Philadelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

NA

NA

NA

NA

 

 

1972 em-

Total

Black

Percent

Station

ployees

HP

HP

black

 

 

 

 

of HP

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

282

177

9

5.1

KYW

202

133

9

6.8

WPVI

153

88

10

11.4

WPHL u

75

24

1

4.2

WTAF u

66

41

2

4.9

WKBS u

65

39

0

0

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

178

108

6

5.6

WQED/WQEX e

155

99

7

7.1

WIIC

144

99

4

4.0

WTAE

130

75

5

6.7

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

74

52

1

1.9

WFBG

59

35

0

0

WARD u

NA

NA

NA

NA

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/

 

Lebanon:

 

WGAL

123

55

1

1.8

WTPA u

40

25

2

8.0

WHP u

38

25

1

4.0

WLYH u

33

20

0

0

WSBA u

18

9

0

0

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton:

 

WBRE u

48

27

0

0

WNEP u

44

30

0

0

WDAU u

34

26

0

0

Erie:

 

WICU

44

31

0

0

WSEE u

25

16

0

0

WJET u

24

19

0

0

WQLN e

16

12

0

0

Clearfield:

 

WPSX e

53

46

0

0

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

17

14

0

0

Scranton:

 

WVIA e

NA

NA

NA

NA

Harrisburg:

 

WITF e

NA

NA

NA

NA

Wilmington, Del./Philadelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

82

60

3

5.0

NOTES:

HP=High Pay (the number of employees reported in the top three categories on the FCC Form 395 Annual Report).

u=UHF.

e=Educational station.

NA=Not available.

CHART III. -- Index for stations in SMSA's with 1 percent or more blacks

 

1971 em-

Percent

 

Index

Station

ployees

blacks in

Index

HP

 

 

SMSA

 

 

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

316

17.52

66.8

25.1

KYW

197

17.52

40.5

20.5

WPVI

193

17.52

53.1

54.8

WPHL u

76

17.52

40.8

45.1

WTAF u

63

17.52

27.4

13.7

WKBS u

61

17.52

65.6

0

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

160

7.07

124.5

56.6

WQUED/WQEX e

153

7.07

110.3

NA

WIIC

141

7.07

120.2

99.0

WTAE

132

7.07

86.3

75.0

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

74

1.35

200.0

148.1

WARD u

9

1.35

0

0

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/

 

Lebanon:

 

WGAL

124

1.67

143.7

NA

WTPA u

40

6.84

73.1

58.5

WHP u

37

6.84

39.5

58.5

WSBA u

20

5.43

0

0

Erie:

 

WICU

41

3.39

70.8

0

WSEE u

28

3.39

0

0

WJET u

24

3.39

9

0

WQLN e

18

3.39

9

0

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

17

1.18

0

0

Harrisburg:

 

WITF

69

6.84

20.5

35.1

Wilmington, Del./Phaldelphi:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

NA

12.19

NA

NA

 

 

1972 em-

 

Index

HP com-

 

ployees

Index

HP

parison

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

282

70.8

29.1

0.41

KYW

202

56.5

38.8

.68

WPVI

153

74.8

65.1

.87

WPHL u

75

59.3

24.0

.52

WTAF u

66

45.1

28.0

.64

WKBS u

65

78.8

0

0

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

178

151.3

79.2

.52

WQED/WQEX e

155

100.4

100.4

1.00

WIIC

144

117.8

56.6

.48

WTAE

130

97.6

94.8

.96

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

74

103.7

140.7

1.41

WARD u

NA

NA

NA

NA

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/

 

Lebanon:

123

143.7

107.8

.74

WTPA u

40

109.6

117.0

1.07

WHP u

38

38.0

58.5

1.52

WSBA u

18

0

0

0

Erie:

 

WICU

44

67.8

0

0

WSEE u

25

0

0

0

WJET u

24

0

0

0

WQLN e

16

0

0

0

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

17

0

0

0

Harrisburg:

 

WITF

NA

NA

NA

NA

Wilmington, Del./Phaldelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

82

60.7

41.8

.68

NOTES:

The Index is the ratio of percent of black employees to the percent of blacks in the Metropolitan area.

The HP comparison is the ratio of percentage of all black employees who are black HP to the percentage of all employees who are HP.

u=UHF.

e=Educational station.

HP=High pay.

NA=Not available.

CHART IV. -- Employment of women

Station

Total 1971

Women

Percent

 

employees

 

 

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

316

73

23.1

KYW

197

35

17.8

WPVI

193

48

24.9

WPHL u

76

16

21.7

WTAF u

63

15

22.7

WKBS u

61

13

21.3

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

160

30

18.8

WQED/QEX e

153

50

32.7

WIIC

144

28

19.9

WTAE

132

23

17.4

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

74

13

17.6

WFBG

60

15

25.0

WARD u

9

2

22.2

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/Lebanon:

 

WGAL

124

32

25.8

WTPA u

40

9

22.5

WHP u

37

12

32.4

WLYH u

27

7

25.9

WSBA u

20

4

20.0

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton:

 

WBRE u

48

10

20.8

WNEP u

45

10

22.2

WDAU u

36

6

16.7

Erie:

 

WICU

41

7

17.1

WSEE u

28

6

21.4

WJET u

24

4

16.7

WQLN e

18

6

33.3

Clearfield:

 

WPSX e

45

7

15.6

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

17

5

29.4

Scranton:

 

WVIA e

18

4

22.2

Harrisburg:

 

WITF

69

25

36.2

Wilmington, Del./Philadelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

NA

NA

NA

 

Station

Total 1972

Women

Percent

 

employees

 

 

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

282

56

19.9

KYW

202

37

18.3

WPVI

153

36

23.5

WPHL u

75

23

30.7

WTAF u

66

16

24.2

WKBS u

65

14

21.5

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

178

33

18.5

WQED/WQEX e

155

49

31.6

WIIC

144

29

20.1

WTAE

130

25

19.2

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

74

13

17.6

WFBG

59

15

25.4

WARD u

NA

NA

NA

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/Lebanon:

 

WGAL

123

32

26.0

WTPA u

40

9

22.5

WHP u

38

11

28.9

WLYH u

33

10

30.3

WSBA u

18

6

33.3

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton:

 

WBRE u

48

9

18.8

WNEP u

44

11

25.0

WDAU u

34

4

11.8

Erie:

 

WICU

44

8

18.2

WSEE u

25

4

16.0

WJET u

24

4

16.7

WQLN e

16

4

25.0

Clearfield:

 

WPSX e

53

9

17.0

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

17

5

29.4

Scranton:

 

WVIA e

NA

NA

NA

Harrisburg:

 

WITF

NA

NA

NA

Wilmington, Del./Philadelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

82

15

18.3

NOTES:

u=UHF.

e=Educational station.

NA=Not available.

CHART V. -- Women in high pay employment

 

 

 

 

Percent

Station

Total 1971

Total HP

HP

women

 

employees

 

women

HP

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

316

205

26

12.7

KTW

197

112

4

3.6

WPVI

193

104

16

15.4

WPHL u

76

38

5

13.2

WTAF u

63

42

3

7.1

WKBS u

61

37

0

0

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

160

100

3

3.0

WQED/WQEX e

153

NA

NA

NA

WIIC

144

100

5

5.0

WTAE

132

76

41

5.3

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

74

51

3

5.9

WFBG

60

34

0

0

WARD u

9

5

0

0

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/Lebanon:

 

WGAL

124

NA

NA

NA

WTPA u

40

25

2

8.0

WHP u

37

24

2

8.3

WCYH u

27

16

1

6.3

WSBA u

20

13

2

15.4

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton:

 

WBRE u

48

28

0

0

WNEP u

45

30

1

3.3

WDAU u

36

26

0

0

Erie:

 

WICU

41

29

0

0

WSEE u

28

17

0

0

WJET u

24

17

1

5.9

WQLN e

18

15

3

20.0

Clearfield:

 

WPSX e

45

38

1

2.6

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

17

14

2

14.3

Scranton:

 

WVIA e

18

14

1

7.1

Harrisburg:

 

WITF e

69

41

8

19.5

Wilmington, Del./Philadelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

NA

NA

NA

NA

 

 

 

 

 

Percent

 

Station

Total 1972

Total HP

HP

women

HP com-

 

employees

 

women

HP

parison

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

282

177

8

4.5

0.22

KTW

202

133

7

5.3

.29

WPVI

153

88

9

10.2

.43

WPHL u

75

24

2

8.3

.29

WTAF u

66

41

3

7.3

.31

WKBS u

65

39

0

0

0

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

178

108

3

2.8

.15

WQED/WQEX e

155

99

15

15.2

.48

WIIC

144

99

7

7.1

.35

WTAE

130

75

4

5.3

.28

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

74

52

3

5.8

.33

WFBG

59

35

0

0

0

WARD u

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/Lebanon:

 

WGAL

123

55

0

0

0

WTPA u

40

25

2

8.0

.35

WHP u

38

25

1

4.0

.14

WCYH u

38

20

3

15.0

.45

WSBA u

18

9

0

0

0

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton:

 

WBRE u

48

27

2

7.4

.39

WNEP u

44

30

2

6.7

.26

WDAU u

34

26

0

0

0

Erie:

 

WICU

44

31

0

0

0

WSEE u

25

16

0

0

0

WJET u

24

19

2

10.5

.63

WQLN e

16

12

0

0

0

Clearfield:

 

WPSX e

53

46

3

6.5

.39

Alentown:

 

WLVT e

17

14

2

14.3

.49

Scranton:

 

WVIA e

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Harrisburg:

 

WITF e

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Wilmington, Del./Philadelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

82

60

2

3.3

.18

NOTES:

u=UFH.

e=Educational station.

HP=high pay (the number of employees reported in the top three categories on the FCC Form 395 Annual Report).

NA=Not available.

See text for explanation of HP comparison.

CHART VI. -- Comparative station rankings -- black employment average

Station

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

3

7

9

7

10

11

14

KYW

5

4

3

2

12

10

8

WPVI

2

1

1

4

9

7

6

WPHL u

7

9

24

21

13

13

11

WTAF u

8

8

2

3

14

12

10

WKBS u

1

14

5

18

8

14

15

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

4

6

7

5

1

6

11

WQED/WQEX e

10

3

22

NA

6

4

4

WIIC

6

10

21

20

3

9

13

WTAE

11

5

8

6

7

5

5

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

16

12

23

19

5

1

2

WFBG

17

14

18

18

NR

NR

NR

WARD u

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/Lebanon:

 

WGAL

14

13

10

NA

2

3

7

WTPA u

9

2

4

1

4

2

3

WHP u

13

11

19

8

15

8

1

WLYH u

17

14

18

18

NR

NR

NR

WSBA u

17

14

18

18

16

14

NR

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton:

 

WBRE u

12

14

16

18

NR

NR

15

WNEP u

17

14

18

18

NR

NR

NR

WDAU u

17

14

18

18

NR

NR

NR

Erie:

 

WICU

15

14

19

18

11

14

15

WSEE u

17

14

18

18

16

14

NR

WJET u

17

14

18

18

16

14

NR

WQLN e

17

14

18

18

16

14

NR

Clearfield:

 

WPSX e

17

14

18

18

NR

NR

NR

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

17

14

18

18

16

14

NR

Scranton:

 

WVIA e

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NR

NA

Harrisburg:

 

WITF e

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Wilmington, Del./Philadelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

9.5

7.5

NA

NA

12.5

9.5

8.8

NOTES:

A=Percent blacks employed 1972.

B=Percent blacks employed in HP jobs (compared with all HP jobs) in 1972.

C=Absolute increase in percent black employed 1971-72.

D=Absolute increase in percent blacks employed in HP jobs 1971-72.

E=Black index 1972 in communities more than 1 percent black.

F=Black index 1972 HP jobs in more than 1 percent black communities.

G=Black HP/Black -- HP total employees 1972 (only stations with blacks).

u=UHF.

e=Educational station.

NA=Not available.

NR=Not ranked because of low percentage of blacks in SMSA.

CHART VII. -- Comparative stations rankings -- women employment

Station

A

B

C

D

E

Philadelphia:

 

WCAU

16

16

21

20

16

KYW

20

14

9

5

12

WPVI

12

5

19

19

5

WPHL u

3

6

2

18

12

WTAF u

11

9

6

6

11

WKBS u

14

19

11

13

19

Pittsburgh:

 

KDKA

19

18

17

15

17

WQED/WQEX e

2

1

18

NA

3

WIIC

15

10

11

4

8

WTAE

17

15

5

7

14

Johnstown/Altoona:

 

WJAC

22

13

14

14

10

WFBG

8

19

10

13

19

WARD u

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Lancaster/York/Harrisburg/Lebanon:

 

WGAL

7

19

11

NA

19

WTPA u

13

7

14

7

9

WHP u

6

17

22

16

18

WLYH u

4

2

3

1

4

WSBA u

1

19

1

21

19

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton:

 

WBRE u

18

8

20

2

6

WNEP u

9

11

4

3

15

WDAU u

26

19

23

13

19

Erie:

 

WICU

21

19

8

13

19

WSEE u

25

19

24

13

19

WJET u

24

4

14

17

1

WQLN e

9

19

25

22

19

Clearfield:

 

WPSK e

23

12

7

2

6

Allentown:

 

WLVT e

5

3

14

13

2

Scranton:

 

WVIA e

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Harrisburg:

 

WITF e

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Wilmington, Del./Philadelphia:

 

WHYY/WUHY e

20

18.5

NA

NA

16.5

NOTES:

A = Percent Women employed 1972.

B = Percent women employed in HP jobs 1972.

C = Absolute increase in percent women employed 1971-72.

D = Absolute increase in percent women employed in HP jobs 1971-72.

E = Women HP/Women -- HP/Total employees 1972.

u = UHF.

e = Educational.

NA = Not available.

RADIO STATIONS -- PHILADELPHIA, PA.

SELECTED DATA CHART I. -- Employment of blacks

 

Percent

1971

 

 

1972

Station

black

employ-

Blacks

Percent

Employ-

 

SMSA

ment

 

black

ment

KYW

17.52

70

5

7.1

84

WCAU

17.52

73

6

8.2

70

KQV

17.52

64

7

10.9

62

WFIL

17.52

61

3

4.9

54

WIP

17.52

54

2

3.7

50

WDAS

17.52

53

22

41.5

47

WHAT

17.52

28

15

53.6

37

WIBG

17.52

34

1

2.9

35

WFLN

17.52

25

1

4.0

25

WDVR

17.52

29

1

3.4

24

WMMR

17.52

18

2

11.1

21

WCOJ

17.52

21

0

0

21

WPBS

17.52

NA

NA

NA

18

WRCP

17.52

22

1

4.5

16

WBCB

17.52

17

0

0

15

WIFI

17.52

12

1

8.3

15

WTEL

17.52

15

0

0

14

WWSH

17.52

14

0

0

13

WYSP

17.52

NA

NA

NA

12

WNPV

17.52

12

0

0

12

WUHY

17.52

NA

NA

NA

11

WPAZ

17.52

NA

NA

NA

8

WBUX

17.52

5

0

0

7

WCHE

17.52

6

0

0

7

 

 

 

Percent

 

HP

HP

Community

Station

Blacks

black

HP

black

compari-

index total

 

 

 

 

 

son

black em-

 

 

 

 

 

 

ployment

KYW

8

9.5

59

6

1.07

54.2

WCAU

9

12.9

49

4

.63

73.6

KQV

8

12.9

42

3

.56

40.5

WFIL

4

7.4

36

2

.75

32.0

WIP

3

6.0

31

2

1.08

34.2

WDAS

22

46.8

31

15

1.03

267.1

WHAT

14

37.8

21

9

1.12

215.8

WIBG

1

2.9

21

0

0

16.6

WFLN

1

4.0

19

0

0

22.8

WDVR

2

8.3

13

0

0

47.4

WMMR

2

9.5

12

0

0

54.2

WCOJ

0

0

11

0

0

0

WPBS

1

5.6

10

1

1.79

32.0

WRCP

0

0

11

0

0

0

WBCB

0

0

9

0

0

0

WIFI

1

6.7

8

1

1.89

38.2

WTEL

0

0

13

0

0

0

WWSH

0

0

8

0

0

0

WYSP

0

0

8

0

0

0

WNPV

0

0

6

0

0

0

WUHY

1

9.1

10

0

0

51.9

WPAZ

0

0

3

0

0

0

WBUX

0

0

6

0

0

0

WCHE

0

0

4

0

0

0

NOTE. -- HP = High pay (the number of employees reported in the top three categories on the FCC Form 395 Annual Report).

RADIO STATIONS. -- PHILADELPHIA, PA. -- Continued

SELECTED DATA CHART II. -- Employment of women

Station

1971 em-

Women

Percent

HP

HP

Percent

1972 em-

 

ployment

 

 

 

women

 

ployment

KYW

70

13

18.6

55

4

7.3

84

WCAU

73

15

20.5

53

4

7.5

70

KQV

64

15

23.4

39

3

7.7

62

WFIL

61

15

24.6

40

2

5.0

54

WIP

54

13

24.1

33

1

3.0

50

WDAS

53

14

26.4

15

0

0

47

WHAT

28

9

32.1

14

1

7.1

37

WIBG

34

7

20.6

20

0

0

35

WFLN

25

6

24.0

19

4

21.1

25

WDVR

29

5

17.2

NA

NA

NA

24

WMMR

18

4

22.2

11

0

0

21

WCOJ

21

k

23.8

12

0

0

21

WPBS

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

18

WRCP

22

3

13.6

15

0

0

16

WBCB

17

5

29.4

3

0

0

15

WIFI

12

3

25.0

NA

NA

NA

15

WTEL

15

2

13.3

13

0

0

14

WWSH

14

2

14.3

NA

NA

NA

13

WYSP

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

12

WNPV

12

3

25.0

8

0

0

12

WUHY

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

11

WPAZ

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

8

WBUX

5

2

40.0

3

0

0

7

WCHE

6

2

33.3

4

0

0

7

 

Station

Women

Percent

HP

HP

Percent

HP com-

 

 

 

 

women

 

parison

KYW

16

19.0

59

3

5.1

0.27

WCAU

14

20.0

49

2

4.1

.20

KQV

16

25.8

42

4

9.5

.37

WFIL

11

20.4

36

1

2.8

.13

WIP

14

28.0

31

2

6.5

.23

WDAS

11

23.4

31

2

6.5

.27

WHAT

9

24.3

21

2

9.5

.36

WIBG

7

20.0

21

0

0

0

WFLN

6

24.0

19

4

21.1

.88

WDVR

5

20.8

13

0

0

0

WMMR

4

19.0

12

0

0

0

WCOJ

6

28.6

11

0

0

0

WPBS

5

27.8

10

0

0

0

WRCP

3

18.8

11

1

9.1

.48

WBCB

4

26.7

9

0

0

0

WIFI

2

13.3

8

0

0

0

WTEL

1

7.1

13

0

0

0

WWSH

2

15.4

8

0

0

0

WYSP

1

8.3

8

0

0

0

WNPV

3

25.0

6

1

16.7

.66

WUHY

2

18.2

10

1

10.0

.55

WPAZ

3

37.5

3

0

0

0

WBUX

2

28.6

6

1

16.7

.58

WCHE

2

28.6

4

1

25.0

.88

NOTE. -- HP = High pay (the number of employees reported in the top three categories on the FCC Form 395 Annual Report).

RADIO STATIONS. -- PITTSBURGH, PA.

SELECTED DATA CHART I. -- Employment of blacks

 

Percent

1971

 

 

1972

 

Station

black

employ-

Black

Percent

employ-

Black

 

SMSA

ment

 

 

ment

 

KDKA

7.07

64

7

10.9

68

8

WJAS

7.07

41

5

12.2

41

5

WWSW

7.07

35

0

0

35

0

WTAE

7.07

36

1

2.8

33

1

WIXZ

7.07

22

1

5.0

20

2

WKPA

7.07

24

0

0

19

0

WAMO

7.07

18

13

76.5

17

13

WKJF

7.07

11

0

0

15

0

WBVP

7.07

14

0

0

15

0

WEEP

7.07

14

0

0

14

0

WESA

7.07

9

0

0

13

0

WJPA

7.07

12

0

0

11

0

WMBA

7.07

8

0

0

10

0

WEDO

7.07

9

0

0

9

1

WPIT

7.07

9

0

0

9

0

WNUF

7.07

NA

NA

NA

7

0

WLOA

7.07

9

0

0

7

0

WTRA

7.07

NA

NA

NA

6

0

WDUQ

7.07

NA

NA

NA

6

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community

Station

Percent

HP

HP

HP com-

index total

 

 

black

 

black

parison

black

 

 

 

 

 

 

employment

KDKA

11.8

51

3

0.51

166.9

WJAS

12.2

26

1

.32

172.6

WWSW

0

26

0

0

0

WTAE

3.0

22

0

0

42.4

WIXZ

10.0

9

0

0

141.4

WKPA

0

10

0

0

0

WAMO

76.5

13

9

.91

1,082.0

WKJF

0

9

0

0

0

WBVP

0

9

0

0

0

WEEP

0

8

0

0

0

WESA

0

7

0

0

0

WJPA

0

7

0

0

0

WMBA

0

6

0

0

0

WEDO

11.1

6

0

0

157.0

WPIT

0

7

0

0

0

WNUF

0

5

0

0

0

WLOA

0

5

0

0

0

WTRA

0

1

0

0

0

WDUQ

0

5

0

0

0

NOTE. -- HP = High pay (the number of employees reported in the top three categories on the FCC Form 395 Annual Report).

RADIO STATIONS. -- PITTSBURGH, PA. -- Continued

SELECTED DATA CHART II. -- Employment of women

 

1971

 

 

 

HP

 

1972

Station

Employ-

Women

Percent

HP

women

Percent

employ-

 

ment

 

 

 

 

 

ment

KDKA

64

9

14.1

47

1

2.1

68

WJAS

41

9

22.2

27

0

0

41

WWSW

35

6

17.1

26

0

0

35

WTAE

36

7

19.4

25

1

4.0

33

WIXZ

22

6

27.3

15

2

13.0

20

WKPA

24

7

29.2

14

0

0

19

WAMO

18

3

16.7

12

0.h0

17

 

WKJF

11

1

9.1

8

0

0

15

WBVP

14

4

28.6

9

1

11.1

15

WEEP

14

2

14.3

10

0

0

14

WESA

9

3

33.3

6

0

0

13

WJPA

12

3

27.3

8

1

12.5

11

WMBA

8

2

25.0

4

0

0

10

WEDO

9

2

22.2

3

0

0

9

WPIT

9

0

0

7

0

0

9*lWNUF

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

7

 

WLOA

9

2

22.2

7

1

14.3

7

WTRA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

6

WDUQ

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

HP

 

HP

 

Station

Women

Percent

HP

women

Percent

comparison

 

 

 

 

 

 

KDKA

11

16.2

51

0

0

0

WJAS

10

24.4

26

0

0

0

WWSW

6

17.1

26

0

0

0

WTAE

7

21.2

22

1

4.5

.21

WIXZ

7

35.0

9

0

0

0

WKPA

6

31.6

10

0

0