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I. Federal Laws & Initiatives

II. Policy Choices & Fiscal Issues in Design

III. Summary tables of State Medicaid Buy-In Programs

IV. Medicaid Buy-In Admin & Evaluations

V. Cross-Disability Coalitions in States

VI. State Programs

VII. WIA, One-Stops, ADA etc.

VIII. SSDI Work Incentive Demos

Comprehensive Person-Centered State Work Incentive Initiatives:

A Resource Center for Developing & Implementing Medicaid Buy In Programs
and
Related Employment Initiatives for Persons with Disabilities


I. Federal Laws and Initiatives


A.     Summary of SSDI, SSI, Medicare & Medicaid Eligibility Policies Related to Disability and Employment:

To become eligible for SSDI or SSI benefits on the basis of disability individuals must prove a combination of significant physical or mental impairments and inability to work. Most of these persons are also eligible for health benefits from the Medicare or Medicaid programs related to their eligibility for SSDI or  SSI.  The interrelated eligibility policies for these programs related to employment have included some work incentives but also many policies which, if an individual works, threatens their eligibility for income assistance or medical benefits.

As efforts are made to develop new State policies to reduce work disincentives, it is necessary to understand the basic provisions in the Federal SSDI, SSI, and Medicare programs and the eligibility options available to each State under the Federal - State Medicaid program related to employment. Decisions related to the development of new State Medicaid policies and related employment initiatives, including Medicaid Buy In programs, which are intended to reduce work disincentives, must be considered in the context of the broader set of current Federal policies and each State's current Medicaid policies.

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B. Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999:

Under the recently enacted Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (Public Law 106-170), new work incentive options are available to states including Medicaid Buy In programs for working persons with disabilities. These new options have the potential to significantly further reduce work disincentives for persons with disabilities who risk loss of health and income assistance benefits if they work. Policy Briefs are provided which contain comprehensive reviews of the work incentive provisions under the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999.


Proposed Regulations Implementing the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program
(Vol. 3, No. 1, February 2001, 12pp. Online version only) This policy brief describes the major provisions in the proposed regulation implementing the new Ticket to Work program, and provides a resource for stakeholders interested in identifying policy issues that require modification or additional clarification in the final regulations. The Social Security Administration must receive comments on the proposed regulations no later than Feb. 26, 2001.

text version (Policy Brief #6, Feb. '01)
pdf version (Policy Brief #6, Feb. '01)


Improvements to the SSDI and SSI Work Incentives and Expanded Availability of Health Care Services to Workers with Disabilities under the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999

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The Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program Established Under the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999.

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C. Workforce Investment Act of 1998:

The overall goal of the recently enacted Workforce Investment Act is to streamline and expand access to numerous workforce investment, educational, and other human resource services and programs for job seekers, including persons with disabilities, and employers. Rather than requiring individuals and employers to seek information and services at several different locations, WIA requires states and communities to create a user-friendly One-Stop system through the coordination at the "street level" of multiple programs and resources. The One-Stop service delivery system must be designed to address the needs of all individuals, including individuals with disabilities. Policy briefs and descriptions of WIA from a disability policy perspective are provided. 

A Description Of The Workforce Investment Act from a Disability Policy Perspective, Title of Paper and Table of Contents

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A Description of the Workforce Investment Act from a Disability Policy Perspective Text of Paper

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Provisions in the Workforce Investment Act Relating to Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability and the Development by the Governor of a Written Methods of Administration

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Provisions in the Workforce Investment Act Describing the Interplay between Workforce Investment Systems and Vocational Rehabilitation programs

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Center for the Study and Advancement of Disability Policy and Center for Health Services Research and Policy at George Washington University

Supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation with additional support provided by NIDRR of the US Department of Education through the RRTC on Workforce Investment and Employment Policy at the Law, Health Policy and Disability Center at the University of Iowa. (#H133B980042) 

Website created and maintained by the Law, Health Policy and Disability Center at the University of Iowa College of Law. The opinions and analyses set out in the articles on this website are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the positions of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the US Department of Education, George Washington University or the University of Iowa.