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The University of Iowa

Winter 2013

IN THIS ISSUE

Parents of the Year

Meet Vince Nelson

Certified to stand out

A letter from the Parents Association president

New on the home front

Student loan savvy

A community to call home

Briefly

For the kids!

Important dates

Iowa Now

 

New on the home front

Construction under way on west campus residence hall

Architectural drawing on new residence hallIn 2012, the University of Iowa broke ground on the first new residence hall to be built on campus since 1968.

The $53 million West Campus Residence Hall will be located near the Field House, just east of Rienow Hall. In addition to housing 501 students, it will include a multi-purpose room with a performance space, a sports grill operated by University Dining, a seminar room, tutoring and group study areas, a common area kitchen, and offices for residence hall staff.

But the most notable feature of the new hall will be its student living space.

“It’s not going to be your traditional residence hall,” says Von Stange, senior director of University Housing & Dining. “Student priorities, interests, wants, and needs have changed in the 44 years since we last built a residence hall at Iowa.”

The new residence hall is designed around the concept of living-learning communities (LLCs)—residential communities that connect students with common academic goals or interests. Those students live together in the residence hall, participate in activities centered on their common interest, and may also take a class or two together. Popular LLCs at Iowa include Women in Science and Engineering, Iowa Writers, and Health Sciences, among others.

“Living-learning communities are the future of housing at Iowa,” Stange says. “So we’ve put a special emphasis on tutoring and study space, as well as community space for the entire west neighborhood.”

The LLCs will be housed in pods of 26 to 28 students in double rooms, and will include a group study room, a lounge with dining space, and private bathrooms. Three floors of the 10-floor building will also include smaller clusters of rooms.

The UI has offered living-learning communities for more than 20 years. During the 2012-13 academic year, approximately one-fourth of the 4,400 first-year students living on campus chose to live in an LLC.

Like all new construction and renovation projects at the UI, the West Campus Residence Hall is designed with sustainability in mind, and will be built to silver LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification standards. Notable sustainability-related characteristics planned for the new residence hall include a heat recovery chiller unit, recycling rooms on each floor, green outlets designed to reduce electricity consumption, and temperature and light sensor controls in student rooms and common areas.

The new residence hall is funded by residence system revenue bonds. Construction is slated for completion in the spring of 2015, with the first student residents occupying the rooms that fall.

Living and lounge areaLiving and lounge area

CafeCafé

Main level walkwayMain-level walkway

Multi-purpose roomMulti-purpose room

 

Current UI residence halls

 

Burge

Burge

  • Second largest hall on the east campus, with 939 residents
  • Opened in 1958
  • Home of Burge Market Place dining facility, which serves east-side halls
  • Named for Adelaide Burge, dean of women from 1920 to 1944 and advocate for adequate women’s housing

Currier

Currier

  • UI’s first residence hall
  • Built on the east campus in 1913-14 to house women
  • 618 residents
  • Named for Amos Currier, who served as professor, librarian, dean, and interim president in the late 1800s, and his wife, Celia, who taught math and Latin

Daum

Daum

  • Built on the east campus in 1964 as an addition to Burge
  • Home to 293 honors students
  • Easy access to Burge and the Blank Honors Center
  • Designated as a “quiet house”
  • Named for Kate Daum, former director of nutrition at UI Hospitals and Clinics

Hillcrest

Hillcrest

  • Largest of the west campus halls,  with 802 residents
  • Built in 1938-39 as a men’s dormitory
  • Home of Hillcrest Market Place dining facility, which serves west-side halls
  • Rented by the Navy during World War II to house cadets

Mayflower

Mayflower

  • Largest hall on the east campus, with 1,009 residents
  • 12 blocks north of the Pentacrest
  • •   A “luxury” dorm built in 1966 and purchased by the UI in 1982
  • Features suites where four students share a bath and kitchenette

Parklawn

Parklawn

  • On the west campus, near City Park
  • Built in 1955 to house married students
  • Has flipped back and forth between family housing and general residence hall use
  • Now home to 98 second-, third-, and fourth-year (unmarried) students
  • Features suites with kitchens

Quadrangle

Quadrangle

  • UI’s second residence hall—and first dormitory for men
  • Opened on the west campus in 1920
  • 358 residents
  • Originally built at the request of the U.S. War Department to serve as Army training barracks during World War I
  • Housed Navy cadets during World War II

Reinow

Rienow

  • 12-story tower with 477 residents
  • Built on the west campus in 1966 as an addition to Quadrangle
  • Named for former dean of men Robert Rienow, who was known for his round-the-clock efforts to help flu victims in 1918 and working to establish a student health division in 1919

Slater

Slater

  • 12-story tower on the west campus
  • Opened in 1968 as “Rienow II”
  • 499 residents
  • Named for Fred “Duke” Slater, who played Hawkeye football in 1920-21, was Iowa’s first black All-American in football, and became a federal judge in Chicago

Stanley

Stanley

  • 10-story hall on the east campus
  • Built in 1966 as an addition to Currier
  • 384 residents
  • Entire building is designated as  a “quiet house”
  • Named for Carrie Stanley, UI graduate, professor of English from 1920 to 1954, and founder of the UI Writing Center

 

 

 

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